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BULLETIN OF NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL 
AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 



Vol. 69, No. 8 



June, 1982 



BULLETIN OF NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNI- 
VERSITY — Published monthly eight times a year except January, September, October, 
and November by North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, 312 North 
Dudley Street, Greensboro, North Carolina 2741 1 . 

Application to Mail at Second Class Postage Rates at Greensboro, North Carolina. 



Postmaster: Send Address Changes to BULLETIN OF NORTH CAROLINA AGRICUL- 
TURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY, 31 2 North Dudley Street, 
Greensboro, North Carolina 2741 1 . 






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BULLETIN 

OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 

AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 

STATE UNIVERSITY 



Greensboro 



GRADUATE 

SCHOOL 

1981-1983 



Graduate School Office 
Room122-Gibbs 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

GENERAL INFORMATION 5 

Administrative Officers 5 

History 6 

Purpose 9 

Organization 10 

Degrees Granted 15 

ADMISSION AND OTHER INFORMATION 17 

Admission to Graduate Study 17 

Housing 17 

Food Services 17 

Residence Classification for Purposes of Applicable Tuition Differentials 18 

Financial Assistance 18 

Expenses 18 

Schedule of Deadlines 19 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 20 

Advising 20 

Class Loads 20 

Concurrent Registration in Other Institutions 20 

Grading System 20 

Professional Education Requirements for Class A Teaching Certificate 21 

Subject-Matter Requirements for Class A Teaching Certificate 21 

REGULATIONS FOR A MASTER'S DEGREE 21 

Admission to Candidacy for a Degree 21 

Credit Requirements 21 

Time Limitation 22 

Course Levels 22 

Transfer of Credit 22 

Final Comprehensive Examination 23 

Options for Degree Program 23 

Master's Thesis and Format 23 

Application for Graduation 24 

Graduate Record Examination 24 

Second Master's Degree 24 

Administrative Policy Concerning Changes in Requirements for Students 

Enrolled in Degree Programs 25 

Commencement 25 

Additional Regulations 25 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 25 

Administration, Supervision and Postsecondary Education 25 

Adult Education 28 

Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 30 

Agricultural Education 32 

Animal Science 33 

Art 34 

Biology 35 

Chemistry 40 

Educational Media 42 

Educational Psychology and Guidance 44 

Engineering 48 

Electrical Engineering 53 

Elementary Education and Reading 55 

English 60 

Foreign Languages 64 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 65 

History 66 

Industrial Education 69 

Industrial Engineering 72 

Home Economics 75 

Mathematics 80 

Music 82 

Physics 82 

Plant Science and Technology 82 

Political Science 83 

Safety and Driver Education 84 

Secondary Education and Curriculum 85 

Speech and Drama 86 

Sociology and Social Service 87 




Edward B. Fort 
Chancellor 



TO: STUDENTS AND PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is a unique comprehen- 
sive state-supported University. It is the only comprehensive University in this State 
which has both a School of Engineering and a School of Agriculture — in consonance 
with its land-grant tradition. In addition, strong program offerings are provided in the 
Schools of Arts and Sciences, Business and Economics, Education and Nursing. Addi- 
tionally, the Institution has a viable Graduate School. Consequently, matriculating 
students are provided unique and varied programmatic offerings. 

The University has a distinguished faculty — one committed to excellence in teach- 
ing, research and public services. Moreover, its Alumni Association is one of the most 
active and productive alumni organizations in the State and Nation. Its support for the 
University and its mission has been exemplary. 

This Catalogue provides specific information you will need to know about the Univer- 
sity. However, a University is more than its program offerings, its faculty, its students, 
its alumni or its campus. A University can best be described as a spirit — Aggie Spirit. 
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University — The Institution — would 
be a barren place without the presence and spirit of its human resources. 

AGGIE SPIRIT is an integral part of this Institution's heritage and tradition. It is 
depicted in the lives of both the Institution's Torchbearers as well as the outstanding 
men and women who left the University their legacy. The heritage and traditions of the 
University are evident in every facet of University life. When one combines this heri- 
tage with the quality of our faculty and the soundness of our mission related programs, 
one readily discerns the greatnesss of the campus. 

I commend this spirit, these programs and this University to all students and pro- 
spective students. 

Edward B. Fort 
Chancellor 



NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY AND INTEGRATION STATEMENT 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is committed to equality 
of educational opportunity and does not discriminate against applicants, students, or 
employees based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or handicap. More- 
over, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is open to people of 
all races and actively seeks to promote racial integration by recruiting and enrolling a 
larger number of white students. 

North Carolina A & T State University supports the protections available to members 
of its community under all applicable Federal laws, including Titles VI and VII of the 
Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Sections 799A 
and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Equal Pay and Age Discrimination Acts, 
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Executive Order 11246. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
Sixteen Constituent Institutions 

WILLIAM C. FRIDAY, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., D.C.L President 

ROY CARROLL, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Vice President-Planning 

RAYMOND H. DAWSON, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Vice President 

Academic Affairs 

EDGAR WALTON JONES, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice President 

Research and Public Service 

L. FELIX JOYNER, A.B Vice President-Finance 

CLEON F. THOMPSON, JR., B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice President 

Student Services and Special Programs 

JOHN P. KENNEDY, JR., S.B., B.A., M.A., J.D Secretary of the University 

GEORGE E. BAIR, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Assistant to the President 

for University Telecommunications 

HUGH S. BUCHANAN, JR., B.A Associate Vice President-Finance 

JOHN F. COREY, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Associate Vice President 

Student Services and Special Programs 

JOHN W. DUNLOP, B.A Director, The University of 

North Carolina Center for Public Television 

KENNIS R. GROGAN, B.S., M.B.A Associate Vice President-Finance 

JAMES L. JENKINS, JR. , A. B Assistant to the President 

ARNOLD K. KING, A.B. , A.M., Ph.D Assistant to the President 

R. D. McMILLAN, JR. , B. S Assistant to the President 

for Governmental Affairs 

RICHARD H. ROBINSON, JR., A.B, LL.B Assistant to the President 

DONALD J. STEDMAN, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Associate Vice President 

Academic Affairs 

ROBERT W. WILLIAMS, JR., A.B., M.A., Ph.D Associate Vice President 

Academic Affairs 



HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The University of North Carolina is comprised of all the public institutions of higher 
education in North Carolina that confer degrees at the baccalaureate level or higher. 
The University was authorized by the State Constitution in 1776, and it was chartered 
in 1789 by the General Assembly. 

The University of North Carolina opened its doors to students at Chapel Hill in 1795. 
Thereafter, beginning in the latter part of the nineteenth century, the General Assem- 
bly of North Carolina has established and supported fifteen other public senior institu- 
tions in keeping with Article IX, Section 8, of the Constitution of North Carolina which 
provides that the "General Assembly shall maintain a public system of higher educa- 
tion, comprising The University of North Carolina and such other institutions of higher 
education as the General Assembly may deem wise." 

By 1969, The University of North Carolina included six constituent institutions, 
governed by a single Board of Trustees. This multi-campus University had its begin- 
nings in legislation enacted in 1931 that defined The University of North Carolina to 
include The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State Univer- 
sity at Raleigh, and The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. In the 1960's three 
additional campuses were added: The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, The 
University of North Carolina at Asheville, and The University of North Carolina at 
Wilmington. 

Beginning in 1877, the General Assembly of North Carolina established or acquired 
ten additional separately governed state-supported senior institutions of higher educa- 
tion. They are: Appalachian State University, East Carolina University, Elizabeth City 
State University, Fayetteville State University, North Carolina Agricultural and Tech- 
nical State University, North Carolina Central University, North Carolina School of the 
Arts, Pembroke State University, Western Carolina University, and Winston-Salem 
State University. Then, in 1971, the General Assembly redefined The University of 
North Carolina, and under the terms of that legislation all sixteen public senior institu- 
tions became constituent institutions of The University of North Carolina. 

The constitutionally authorized Board of Trustees of the six-campus University of 
North Carolina was designated the Board of Governors and this body is by law The 
University of North Carolina. The Board of Governors consists of thirty-two members 
elected by the General Assembly, and it is charged with "the general determination, 
control, supervision, management, and governance of all affairs of the constituent 
institutions." The chief executive officer of The University is the President. 

Each constituent institution of The University has its own faculty and student body. 
The chief administrative officer of each institution is the chancellor, and the chancellors 
are responsible to the President. 

Each constituent institution also has a board of trustees composed of thirteen mem- 
bers: eight elected by the Board of Governors, four appointed by the Governor, and the 
elected president of the student body ex officio. (The School of the Arts has two addi- 
tional ex officio trustees.) The principal powers of these institutional boards are exer- 
cised under a delegation of authority from the Board of Governors. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Board of Governors 
The University of North Carolina 

John R. Jordan, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. Hugh Morton, Vice Chairman 

Louis T. Randolph, Secretary 



Class of 1983 

Irwin Belk 

Wayne A. Corpening 
Daniel C. Gunter, Jr. 
Mrs. Howard Holderness 
John R. Jordan, Jr. 
J. Aaron Prevost 
Louis T. Randolph 
Harley F. Shuford, Jr. 

Class of 1985 

Furman P. Bodenheimer 
Laurence A. Cobb 
John Edwin Davenport 
Charles Z. Flack, Jr. 
James E. Holmes 
Reginald F. McCoy 
Mrs. John F. McNair, III 
Maceo A. Sloan 



Class of 1987 

B. Irvin Boyle 
William A. Dees, Jr. 
Jacob H. Froelich, Jr. 
James E. Holshouser, Jr. 
William A. Johnson 
Robert L. Jones 
E.B. Turner 
(1 Vacancy) 

Class of 1989 

Mrs. Geneva J. Bowe 
Philip G. Carson 
Walter R. Davis 
R. Phillip Haire 
Mrs. Hugh Morton 
AsaT. Spaulding, Jr. 
David J. Whichard, II 
William K. Woltz 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University was established as the A. 
and M. College for the "Colored Race" by an act of the General Assembly of North 
Carolina ratified March 9, 1891. The act read in part: 

That the leading object of the institution shall be to teach practical agricul- 
ture and the mechanic arts and such branches of learning as relate thereto, 
not excluding academical and classical instruction. 
The College began operation during the school year of 1890-91 , before the passage of 
the state law creating it. This curious circumstance arose out of the fact that the Morrill 
Act passed by Congress in 1890 earmarked the proportionate funds to be allocated in bi- 
racial school systems to the two races. The A. and M. College for the White Race was 
established by the State Legislature in 1889 and was ready to receive its share of funds 
provided by the Morrill Act in the Fall of 1890. Before the college could receive these 
funds, however, it was necessary to make provisions for Colored students. Accordingly, 
the Board of Trustees of the A. and M. College in Raleigh was empowered to make 
temporary arrangements for these students. A plan was worked out with Shaw Univer- 
sity in Raleigh where the College operated as an annex to Shaw University during the 
years 1890-1891, 1891-1892, and 1892-1893. 

The law of 1891 also provided that the College would be located in such city or town in 
the State as would make to the Board of Trustees a suitable proposition that would serve 
as an inducement for said location. A group of interested citizens in the city of Greens- 
boro donated fourteen acres of land for a site and $11,000 to aid in constructing build- 
ings. This amount was supplemented by an appropriation of $2,500 from the General 
Assembly. The first building was completed in 1893 and the College opened in Greens- 
boro during the fall of that year. 

In 1915 the name of the institution was changed to The Agricultural and Technical 
College of North Carolina by an Act of the State Legislature. 

The scope of the college program has been enlarged to take care of new demands. The 
General Assembly authorized the institution to grant the Master of Science degree in 
education and certain other fields in 1939. The first Master's degree was awarded in 
1941. The School of Nursing was established by an Act of the State Legislature in 1953 
and the first class was graduated in 1957. 

The General Assembly repealed previous acts describing the purpose of the College 
in 1957, and redefined its purpose as follows; 

"The primary purpose of the College shall be to teach the Agricultural and 
Technical Arts and Sciences and such branches of learning as related thereto; 
the training of teachers, supervisors, and administrators for the public 
schools of the State, including the preparation of such teachers, supervisors 
and administrators for the Master's degree. Such other programs of a profes- 
sional or occupational nature may be offered as shall be approved by the 
North Carolina Board of Higher Education, consistent with the appropria- 
tions made therefor." 
The General Assembly of North Carolina voted to elevate the College to the status of 
a Regional University effective July 1, 1967. 

On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly ratified an Act to consolidate the Institu- 
tions of Higher Learning in North Carolina. Under the provisions of this Act, North 
Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University became a constituent institution 
of The University of North Carolina effective July 1, 1972. 

Six presidents have served the Institution since it was founded in 1891. They are as 
follows: Dr. J.O. Crosby (1892-1896), Dr. James B. Dudley, (1896-1925), Dr. F.D. 



Bluford (1925-1955), Dr. WarmothT. Gibbs (1956-1960), Dr. Samuel DeWitt Proctor, 
(1960-1964), and Dr. Lewis C. Dowdy, who was elected President April 10, 1964. Dr. 
Cleon F. Thompson, Jr. , served as Interim Chancellor of the Institution from Novem- 
ber 1, 1980 until August 31, 1981. Dr. Edward B. Fort assumed Chancellorship respon- 
sibilities on September 1, 1981. 

HISTORY AND PURPOSE OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Graduate education at North Carolina A. and T. State University was authorized by 
the North Carolina State Legislature in 1939. The authorization provided for training in 
agriculture, technology, applied science, and applied areas of study. An extension of 
the graduate program, approved by the General Assembly of North Carolina in 1957, 
provided for enlargement of the curriculum to include teacher education, as well as 
such other programs of a professional or occupational nature as might be approved by 
the North Carolina State Board of Higher Education. 

On July 1, 1967, the legislature of North Carolina approved regional university status 
for the institution and renamed it North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University. The graduate responsibilities of the institution as a regional university are 
to prepare teachers, supervisors, and administrators for the master's degree, to offer 
master's degree programs in the liberal arts and sciences, and to conduct such other 
programs as are deemed necessary to meet the needs of its constituency and of the state. 

The University awarded its first master's degree in 1941 to Woodland Ellroy Hall. 
Since that time, several thousand students have received this coveted degree of ad- 
vanced studies. A significant number of these graduates have gone on to other universi- 
ties to achieve the prestigious doctorate degree in their chosen specialties. 

The Graduate School through its various disciplines is affiliated with The American Chemi- 
cal Society, The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. (ABET), The 
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, The Council of Graduate 
Schools in The United States and other prestigious regional and national academic bodies. 

The Graduate School has an integrated faculty and student body. It coordinates 
advanced course offerings of all departments within the School of Agriculture, the 
School of Education, the School of Arts and Sciences, and the School of Engineering. 
Thus, the Graduate School offers advanced study for qualified individuals who wish to 
improve their competence for careers in professions related to agriculture, humanities, 
education, social studies, science, and technology. Such study of information and tech- 
niques is provided through curricula leading to the Master of Science or Master of Arts 
degree and through institutes and workshops designed for those who are not candidates 
for a higher degree. Second, the Graduate School provides a foundation of knowledge 
and of techniques for those who wish to continue their education in doctoral programs 
at other institutions. Third, the Graduate School assumes the responsibility of en- 
couraging scholarly research among students and faculty members. 

It is expected that, while studying at this university, graduate students (1) will 
acquire special competence in at least one field of knowledge; (2) will develop further 
their ability to think independently and constructively; (3) will develop and demon- 
strate the ability to collect, organize, evaluate, and report facts which will enable them 
to make a scholarly contribution to knowledge about their discipline; and (4) will make 
new applications and adaptations of existing knowledge so as to contribute to their 
profession and to human-kind. 



ORGANIZATION 
Graduate School Council 

The Graduate School Council is responsible for formulating all academic policies and 
regulations affecting graduate students, graduate courses, and graduate curricula. The 
council consists of the chairpersons of the departments offering concentrations in grad- 
uate studies, the deans of the schools offering graduate instruction, the Director of the 
Summer School, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, the Director of Admissions, 
Registration and Records, and the Director of Teacher Education, five graduate students 
elected from the Graduate Club, and five faculty members selected from the graduate faculty. 
The Dean of the Graduate School serves as chairperson of the council. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEES OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Standing committees of the Graduate School are organized to advise the council on 
matters pertaining to present policies, to evaluate existing and proposed programs of 
study, and to process student petitions relating to academic matters. These committees 
are: 

Committee on Admissions and Retention 

Committee on Curriculum 

Committee on Publications 

Committee on Rules and Policy 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Carson Bain Greensboro 

Marshall B. Bass Winston-Salem 

Lacy H . Caple Lexington 

Elizabeth W. Cone Greensboro 

C.C. Griffin Concord 

William L. Hemphill Greensboro 

Jesse Jackson Chicago, Illinois 

Stephen Kirk Greensboro 

Robert A. Kraay Greensboro 

Paul Locklear Pembroke 

McArthur Newell Greensboro 

Mack Pearsall Rocky Mount 

Otis E. Tillman High Point 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edward B. Fort, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Chancellor 

Nathan F. Simms, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

Charles C. Mclntyre, B.S., M.B.A Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs 

Jesse E. Marshall, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 

Albert E. Smith, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice Chancellor for Development 

and University Relations 

Dorothy J. Alston, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Special Assistant to the Chancellor 

for Administrative Affairs 



10 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Nathan F. Simms, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

Willie T. Ellis, B.S., M.S., PhD Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Academic Affairs 

Ronald O. Smith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Assistant Vice Chancellor 

for Academic Affairs 

Suresh Chandra, B.Sc, M.Ch.E., Ph.D Dean, School of Engineering 

Quiester Craig, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D Dean, School of Business and Economic 

William DeLauder, B.S., Ph.D Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

S. Joseph Shaw, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Dean, School of Education 

Albert W. Spruill, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Dean, The Graduate School 

B.C. Webb, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Dean, School of Agriculture 

Marietta Raines, B.S.,M.A Acting Dean, School of Nursing 

Alene Young, A.B., M.L.S., Acting Director of Library Services 

Rudolph Artis, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Director of Registration and Records 

Clenton A. Blount, Jr., B.S., M.A Director of Admissions 

Colonel Monroe J. Fuller, B.S., M.A Professor of Aerospace Studies 

Colonel Charles H. Jackson, B.S Professor of Military Science 

Tommie M. Young, B.A., M.A.L.S., Ph.D Director of Instructional Services 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Jesse E. Marshall, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 

Sullivan Welborne, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Dean of Student 

Affairs for Service 

William Goode, B.S Dean of Student Affairs for Student 

Management and Human Relations 

Lucille Piggott, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D Dean of Student Affairs for Student Life 

Robert L. Wilson, A.B., M.S., Ph.D Director of Counseling Services 

Leon Warren, B.S., M.S Director of Career Planning and Placement 

Roger McKee, B.S., M.S Director of Memorial Union 

Marilynn Burnette, B.S., M.S Director of International and 

Minority Student Affairs 

Norma Pennix, B.S., M.S Director of Veterans and 

Handicapped Student Affairs 

Prabhakar Pendse, M.D.,F.A.C.S Director of Health Services 

Dorothy Bailey, B.S., M.S Director of Student Activities 

FISCAL AFFAIRS 

Charles C. Mclntyre, B.S., M.B.A Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs 

Robert O. Kelley, B.S., M.P.A Director of Accounting 

Paula Jeffries, B.S Acting Budget Officer 

Clara Pinkney, B.S., M.S Internal Auditor 

Doris D. Canada, R. S Director of Personnel 

Maxine D. Davis, B.S., M.Ed Director of Purchasing 

Nathaniel Hall, B.S Director of Contracts and Grants 

Gerard Gray, B.S., M.S Director of Physical Plant 

Jagjit Gulati, B.A.,M.S Director of Computer Services 

Alberta Dalton, B.S., M.S Director of Student Financial Aid 

Claybon Harris, B.S., C.P. A Director of Auxiliary Services 



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DEVELOPMENT AND UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

Albert E. Smith, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice Chancellor for Development 

and University Relations 

Richard Moore, B.S., M.S. Ed.D Director of Information Services 

Joseph D. Williams, B.S., M.S Director of Alumni Affairs 

Shirley T. Frye, B.S., M.S Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Development and University Relations 

Joseph Faust, A.B Director of Sports Information 

Harold L. Lanier, B.S., M.S Director of Cooperative Education 

BertC. Piggott, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Director of Athletics 

OFFICERS EMERITI 

Lewis C. Dowdy, A.B., M.A., Ed.D., Litt. D Chancellor Emeritus 

Warmoth T. Gibbs, A. B. , Ed. M. , LL. D President Emeritus 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

Greensboro 2741 1 

Graduate Council Members 

1981-82 

Albert W. Spruill, Ed. D. , Dean of Graduate School, Chairperson 

Nathan Simms, Jr. Ph.D., Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

Dorothy Prince Barnett, Ed.D., Chairperson, Department of Secondary 

Education and Curriculm 

Isaac Barnett, Ph.D., Director of Safety and Driver Education 

Nabil Bousaba, Student Representative 

Arthur P. Bell, Ed.D., Chairperson, Department of Agricultural Education 

Frank Bell, Ph.D., Chairperson, Department of History and Social Science 

Clenton A. Blount, B.S., M.A., Director of Admissions 

Henry Cameron, Ed. D. , Acting Chairperson, Department of Administration , 

Supervision and Postsecondary Education 

Suresh Chandra, Ph.D., Dean, School of Engineering 

William J. Craft. Ph.D., Faculty Representative 

William DeLauder, Ph.D., Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

Sidney Evans, Ph.D., Chairperson, Department of Agricultural Economics 

George C. Gail, M.S., Chairperson, Department of Industrial Education 

Seetha Ganapathy, Ph.D., Faculty Representative 

B.W. Harris, Ph.D., Chairperson, Department of Adult Education and 

Community Services 

Arthur Hicks, Ph.D., Chairperson, Department of Biology 

Sateesh Hiremagalur, Student Representative 

LeRoy Holmes, A.M. Chairperson, Department of Art 

Frissell Jones, Ph.D., Faculty Representative 

Wendell P. Jones, Ph.D., Chairperson, Department of Mathematics 

Wyatt Kirk, Ed.D., Chairperson, Department of Educational Psychology and 

Guidance 

A.W. Wortham, Ph.D., Chairperson, Department of Industrial Engineering 

Harold Mazyck, Ph.D., Chairperson, Department of Home Economics 

Calvin Irvin, M. A., Acting Chairperson, Department of Health and Physical 

Education 

Gracie Potts, Student Representative 

Vala Rao, Student Representative 

Phyllis Saunders, Student Representative 

Joseph Shaw, Ph.D., Dean, School of Education 

Winser Alexander, Ph.D., Chairperson, Department of Electrical Engineering 

Marian Vick, Ed. D. , Chairperson, Department of Elementary Education and 

Reading 

Jimmy L. Williams, Ph.D., Chairperson, Department of English 

Walter Wright, Ph.D., Acting Chairperson, Department of Chemistry 

Tommie Young, Ph.D., Chairperson, Department of Educational Media 

LOCATION 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is located in the City of 
Greensboro, North Carolina. This urban location puts major shopping centers, 
churches, theaters, medical facilities and transportation within convenient distance for 
the students. This location offers an advantage to many students who desire parttime 
employment while attending the University. 



13 



The City of Greensboro offers a variety of cultural activities and recreational facili- 
ties. It has become known for its colleges and universities, art galleries, libraries and 
museum. 

The Memorial Auditorium attracts outstanding athletic events, concerts, and other 
popular events. The City offers facilities for bowling, boating, fishing, horseback rid- 
ing, tennis and golf. 

THE PHYSICAL PLANT 

The university campus comprises modern, fire resistent buildings, all thoroughly 
maintained for the highest level of efficiency, located on land holdings in excess of 181 



UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS 

Dudley Memorial Building (Administration) 

F.D. Bluford Library 

Harrison Auditorium 

Charles Moore Gymnasium 

Coltrane Hall (Headquarters for N.C. Agricultural Extension Service) 

Memorial Union 

The Oaks (President's Residence) 

Corbett Sports Center 

CLASS ROOM AND LABORATORY BUILDINGS 

Carver Hall School of Agriculture 

Cherry Hall School of Engineering 

Crosby Hall School of Arts and Sciences 

Gibbs Hall Social Sciences & School of Graduate Studies 

Hodgin Hall School of Education 

Noble Hall School of Nursing 

Price Hall Division of Industrial Education and Technology 

Benbow Hall Home Economics 

Garret House Home Economics 

Hines Hall Chemistry 

Sockwell Hall Agricultural Technology 

Ward Hall Dairy Manufacturing 

Reid Greenhouses 

Graham Hall School of Engineering and Computer Science Center 

Frazier Hall Music — Art 

Price Hall Division of Industrial Education & Technology 

Price Hall Annex Child Development Laboratory 

Campbell Hall ROTC Headquarters 

Barnes Hall Biology 

Merrick Hall School of Business and Economics 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

Curtis Hall (148) Morrison Hall (94) 

Gibbs Hall (200) Vanstory Hall (200) 

High Rise Dormitory (East) (194) Cooper Hall (400) 

High Rise Dormitory (West) (208) Scott Hall (1010) 

Holland Hall (144) Senior Hall (200) 

SERVICE BUILDINGS 

Murphy Hall Student Services 

Brown Hall Cafeteria, Post Office, Student Financial Aid Office 

14 



Sebastian Infirmary 
T.E. Neal Heating Plant 
Laundry — Dry Cleaning Plant 

Williams Hall Cafeteria 

Clyde Dehuguley Physical Plant Building 

OTHER FACILITIES 

University Farms — including 600 acres of land and modern farm buildings 
Athletic field — including three practice fields for football, quarter mile track, baseball 
diamond and field house 

DEGREES GRANTED 

The Graduate School of North Carolina A. and T. State University offers the follow- 
ing degrees: 

MASTER OF ARTS 

English and Afro-American Literature 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 

1. Adult Education 

2. Agricultural Economics 

A. Agricultural Marketing 

B. Production Economics 

C. Rural Development 

3. Biology 

4. Chemistry 

5. Electrical Engineering 

6. Engineering 

7. Food and Nutrition 

8. French 

9. Industrial Engineering 

10. Specialized Teaching and Related Fields 

A. Administration, Supervision and Post-Secondary Education 

(1) Administration 

(2) Supervision 

B. Agricultural Education 

C. Educational Media 

D. Elementary Education and Reading 

(1) Early Childhood Education 

(2) Elementary Education 

(3) Intermediate Education 

(4) Reading 

E. Guidance or Counseling Education 

(1) Agency Counseling 

(2) Counselor — Education 

(3) Human Resources 

F. Industrial Education 

(1) Industrial Arts Education 

(2) Vocational Industrial Education 

11. Specialized Secondary Education Teaching Fields with Majors in Subject Matter 
Departments 

A. Art 

B. Biology 

C. Chemistry 

D. English 

E. History 

15 



F. Mathematics 

G. Health and Physical Education 
H. Social Science 

Master of Science programs in Agricultural Education, Education and Industrial 
Education enable students to become eligible for the following certificates issued by 
the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction: 

1. Graduate Elementary Certificate 

2. Graduate Secondary Certificate 

3. Administrator I (Master's degree) 

4. Curriculum Instructional Specialist 

5. Local Directors of Vocational Education 

6. Middle Grades Occupational Exploration 

7. Industrial Cooperative Training 



16 



ADMISSION AND OTHER INFORMATION 



ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDY 

All applicants for graduate study must have earned a bachelor's degree from a four- 
year college. Application forms must be submitted to the Graduate School Office with 
two transcripts of previous undergraduate and graduate studies. Processing of applica- 
tions cannot be guaranteed unless they are received, with all supporting documents, in 
the Graduate Office at least fifteen days before a registration period. Applicants may be 
admitted to graduate studies unconditionally, provisionally, or as special students. 
Applicants are admitted without discrimination because of race, color, creed, or sex. 

Unconditional Admission 

To qualify for unconditional admission to graduate studies, an applicant must have 
earned an over-all average of 2.6 on a 4 point system (or 1.6 on a 3 point system) in his/ 
her undergraduate studies. In addition, a student seeking a degree in Agricultural 
Education, Elementary Education, Industrial Education, or Secondary Education 
must possess, or be qualified to possess, a Class A Teaching Certificate in the area in 
which he/she wishes to concentrate his/her graduate studies. A student seeking a de- 
gree with concentration in Administration or Guidance must possess, or be qualified to 
possess, a Class A Teaching Certificate. 

Provisional Admission 

An applicant may be admitted to graduate studies on a provisional basis if (1) he/she 
earned his/her baccalaureate degree from a non-accredited institution or (2) the record 
of his/her undergraduate preparation reveals deficiences that can be removed near the 
beginning of his/her graduate study. A student admitted provisionally may be required 
to pass examinations to demonstrate his/her knowledge in specified areas, to take 
specified undergraduate courses to improve his/her background, or to demonstrate his/ 
her competence for graduate work by earning no grades below "B" in his/her first nine 
hours of graduate work at this institution. 

Special Students 

Students not seeking a graduate degree at A. and T. may be admitted in order to take 
courses for self-improvement or for renewal of teaching certificate if said students meet 
standard Graduate School entrance requirements. If a student subsequently wishes to 
pursue a degree program, he/she must request an evaluation of his/her record. The 
Graduate School reserves the right to refuse to accept towards a degree program credits 
which the candidate earned while enrolled as a special student; in no circumstances 
may the student apply towards a degree program more than twelve semester hours 
earned as a special student. 

HOUSING 

The university maintains six residence halls for women and three for men. A request 
for dormitory housing accommodation should be directed to the Dean of Students at 
least sixty days prior to the expected date of registration. 

FOOD SERVICES 

The university provides food service for students at minimum cost. Two cafeterias 
and a snack bar are operated at convenient locations on the campus. Students who live 
in the residence halls are required to eat in the cafeterias. 



17 



RESIDENCE CLASSIFICATION FOR PURPOSES OF APPLICABLE 
TUITION DIFFERENTIALS 

Residence classification for tuition purposes are set forth by law in North Carolina as 
follows: 

G. S. 116-143. 1 — (The controlling North Carolina Statute) "To qualify as a 
resident for tuition purposes, a person must have established legal residence 
(domicile) in North Carolina and maintained that legal residence for at least 
12 months immediately prior to his or her classification as a resident for 
tuition purposes." This Statute also sets forth statutory definitions, rules, 
and special provisions for determining resident status for tuition purposes. 
These provisions include special rules with respect to persons who are mar- 
ried or who are within identified subclasses of minors. Under the Statute G. 
S. 116-143.2 Indochina refugees may qualify for special considerations; cer- 
tain other aliens may also qualify for resident tuition status. 
University regulations concerning the classification of students by residence, for 
purposes of applicable tuition differentials, are set forth in detail in A Manual To Assist 
The Public Higher Education Institutions of North Carolina in the Matter of Student 
Residence Classification for Tuition Purposes . Each student is responsible for knowing 
the contents of that Manual, which is the controlling administrative statement of policy 
on this subject. Copies of the Manual are available on request in The Office of Admis- 
sions of A. and T. State University for purposes of student inspection. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Graduate Assistants 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available to qualified individuals. 
The student is assigned to assist a professor or a department twenty hours per week for 
the duration of the assistantship. Some graduate assistants are assigned to teach fresh- 
man classes. Normally, a graduate assistant will be assigned to teach only one class per 
semester, but he/she may be assigned to teach a maximum of two. The assistantship 
offers a stipend in addition to the funds required for tuition, fees, books, and board and 
lodging expenses for residence on campus. Application for an assistantship must be 
made to the Dean of the Graduate School at least five months before fall registration. 
Only full-time graduate students are eligible. 

Other Assistance 

Funds, such as the National Direct Student Loan Fund, are available in limited 
quantity for students. Requests for information concerning these funds should be 
directed to the Graduate School. The newest kind of financial assistance available is the 
Minority Presence Grant. This grant is state funded and at A. and T. is made available to 
white North Carolina residents. 

EXPENSES 

The fee charged to a full-time student carrying nine or more semester hours of work 
are the same as those charged to full-time undergraduate students. For one academic 
year, a state resident should expect to pay $799.00 which will cover tuition and course 
fees; this sum does not include room and board charges. Tuition and course fees for an 
out-of-state student carrying a full schedule will total $2,587.00 for the academic year. 
Current room and board rates are $802.00 per semester. 

As student fees are subject to change without prior notice, it is suggested that the 
Cashier's Office be consulted for complete information concerning charges for full and 
part-time students. 



18 



Special Fees 

Fee for processing application (required only for first application 
for graduate studies) $15.00 

Late Registration 15.00 

Graduation fees: 

Diploma 15.00 

Regalia 15.00 

Transcript (after the first one) 1.00 

Master's Thesis binding fee 20.00 

Auditing 

To audit a course, a student must obtain permission from the Dean of the Graduate 
School and must submit the necessary forms during the registration period. A parttime 
student must pay all fees, including tuition, that would be charged to a student taking 
the course for credit. A full-time student is not required to pay any additional fees for 
auditing. A change from "credit" registration to "audit" will not be permitted after the 
close of the deadline date for withdrawing from a course. An auditor is not required to 
participate in class discussions, prepare assignments, or take examinations. 

SCHEDULE OF DEADLINES 

The Graduate School provides schedules of specific dates for completing various 
requirements for a degree program. These notices are not sent to individuals automati- 
cally, but may be found in the calendar of the Graduate School, available upon request. 

REQUEST FOR GRADE REPORTS AND TRANSCRIPTS 

The Office of Registration and Records is the official record keeping office at the 
college. Request for official statements regarding courses completed, grade reports, or 
transcripts should be directed to that office. 

REQUEST FOR GRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Course descriptions are available upon request from the Dean of the Graduate School. 



19 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 
ADVISING 



Until he/she is assigned to an advisor after he/she has been accepted as a candidate in a 
degree program, a graduate student is advised by a member of the graduate faculty appointed 
by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student, however, should consult and follow the 
curriculum guide prepared for his/her area of concentration. Separate curriculum guide 
sheets are available in the office of the department offering the concentration. They may be 
secured also from the Graduate School Office. 

"Special" students are advised by members of the graduate faculty appointed by the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

CLASS LOADS 

Full-Time Students 

Class loads for the full-time students may range from 9 to 15 semester hours during a 
regular session of the academic year. The maximum load is 15 semester hours. 

In-Service Teachers 

The maximum load for a fully employed in-service teacher must not exceed six semes- 
ter hours during any academic year. 

University Staff 

The maximum load for any fully employed member of the university faculty or staff 
will be six semester hours for the academic year. 

CONCURRENT REGISTRATION IN OTHER INSTITUTIONS 

A student registered in a degree program in this Graduate School may not enroll 
concurrently in another graduate school except upon permission, secured in advance, 
from the Dean of the Graduate School. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Grades for graduate students are recorded as follows: A, excellent; B, average C, 
below average; F, failure; S, work in progress (for courses in research); I, INCOM- 
PLETE; W. withdrawal. 

1. In order to earn a degree, a student must have a cumulative average of "B," (a 
grade point average of 3.0 on a system in which 1 hour of A earns 4 grade points). 

2. A graduate student automatically goes on probation when his/her cumulative aver- 
age falls below "B." 

3. A student may be dropped from the degree program if he/she has not been re- 
moved from probation after two successive terms as a full-time student. 

4. A student may not repeat a required course in which "C" or above was earned. 

5. A student may repeat a required course in which "F" was earned. A student may 
not repeat the course more than once. If a student fails a second time, he/she is 
dismissed from the degree program. 

6. All hours attempted in graduate courses and all grade points earned are included 
in the computation of the cumulative average of a graduate student. 

7. A student who stops attending a course but fails to withdraw officially may be 
assigned a grade of "F." 

8. All grades of "I" must be removed during the student's next term of residence. 

9. A student may not count towards a degree program any course in which a grade of 
"F" was earned. 

20 



Note: The North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction does not accept 
towards renewal of certification any course in which a student has received a grade of 
"D"or"F." 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 
FOR CLASS A TEACHING CERTIFICATE 

In all graduate degree programs except those leading to a Master of Science in 
Chemistry, in Biology, in Food and Nutrition, and the Master of Science in Engi- 
neering, the student at A. & T. State University must hold a Class A certificate before 
being admitted to candidacy. 

To provide the professional education component for the student who enters gradu- 
ate studies without the required credits in courses in education and who is pursuing a 
teaching program for the secondary school level, the following program of 24 semester 
hours is offered: Education 625, Education 400 (Psychological Foundations of Educa- 
tion), Guidance 600 and the Student Teaching Block; Education 500 (Principles and 
Curricula of Secondary Schools, the appropriate subject methods course, Education 
637, and Education 560 (Observation and Student Teaching). 

Students who have earned some but not enough undergraduate credits in education 
and students without "A" certificates who are seeking graduate degrees in early child- 
hood education (Kindergarten-grade 3) should consult with the chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Education or the Dean of the Graduate School to work out programs to meet 
certification requirements. 

While taking undergraduate courses in education and psychology to meet certifica- 
tion requirements, a student may enroll in graduate-level courses in his subject matter 
area of concentration if he has completed the undergraduate requirements in that area. 

SUBJECT-MATTER REQUIREMENTS FOR 
CLASS A TEACHING CERTIFICATE 

If a student has not completed sufficient undergraduate courses in a subject-matter 
field to hold a Class A certificate in that subject, he should consult with the chairman of 
the department offering that concentration. Together, they must work out a program to 
satisfy the undergraduate deficiencies by means of undergraduate courses or courses 
open to undergraduates and graduates. 



REGULATIONS FOR A MASTER'S DEGREE 
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR A DEGREE 



Admission to graduate studies does not guarantee admission to candidacy for a degree. In 
order to be qualified as a candidate for a degree, a student must have a minimum overall 
average of 3.0 in at least nine semester hours of graduate work at A. and T., must have 
removed all deficiencies resulting from undergraduate preparation, and must have passed the 
Qualifying Essay. Some departments require additional qualifying examinations. 

In order to be classified as a candidate for a Master of Science in Engineering degree, a 
student must have a minimum overall average of 3.0 in at least nine semester hours of 
approved graduate work at A. and T. and must have removed all deficiencies resulting from 
undergraduate preparation. 

The following is the procedure for securing admission to candidacy: 

1. The student secures application forms for admission to candidacy from the Graduate 
Office, fills them out, and returns them to that office. This step should be taken as soon as 
possible after the student has decided upon a degree program. 

2. The Graduate Office processes the application, notifies the student of the action, and 
informs him/her of the time when the Qualifying Essay will next be administered. 

21 



3. The student may take the Qualifying Essay during the first term of residence in graduate 
studies. If a student fails the Qualifying Essay, he/she may take it a second time. After a second 
failure the student must enroll in a prescribed English composition course (English 300 or 
621) at this university and must earn a grade of "C or above. 

4. The Graduate Office informs the student of any qualifying examinations required by the 
department in which he is concentrating his studies. 

5. After the student has completed at least nine semester hours of graduate study at the 
college, he/she becomes eligible for admission to candidacy. If, at that time, he/she has 
maintained an average of 3.0 in graduate studies, has passed the Qualifying Essay and all 
departmental qualifying examinations, the Graduate School informs the student that he/she 
has been admitted to candidacy and assigns him/her to an adviser in his/her field of concentra- 
tion. 

In order to be eligible for graduation during a term, a student must have been admitted to 
candidacy no less than fifteen days prior to the deadline for filing for graduation during that 
term. 

CREDIT REQUIREMENTS 

The minimum credit requirements for a graduate degree are thirty semester hours 
for students in thesis and non-thesis programs. It is expected that a student can com- 
plete a program by studying full-time for an academic year and one additional summer 
term or by studying full-time during four nine-week summer sessions. 

The mimimum credit requirements for a Master of Science in Engineering are thirty 
semester hours for students who elect to take the thesis option and thirty-three semes- 
ter hours for students who take the non-thesis option. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of three-fourths of the hours required for the degree must be earned in 
residence study at the university. 

TIME LIMITATION 

The graduate program must be completed within six successive calendar years. Pro- 
grams remaining incomplete after this time interval are subject to cancellation, revi- 
sion, or special examination for out-dated work. 

When the program of study is interrupted because the student has been drafted into 
the armed services, the time limit shall be extended for the length of time the student 
shall have been on active duty, if the candidate resumes graduate work no later than one 
year following his/her release from military service. 

COURSE LEVELS 

At the University, six-digit numbers are used to designate all course offerings. The 
last three digits indicate the classification level of the course. Courses numbered 600 
through 699 are open to seniors and to graduate students. Courses number 700 through 
799 are open only to graduate students. At least fifty percent of the courses counted in 
the work towards a Master's degree must be those open only to graduate students; that 
is, numbered 700 through 799. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate credit may be transferred from another 
graduate institution if (1) the work is acceptable as credit toward a comparable degree at 
the institution from which transfer is sought, and (2) the courses to be transferred are 
approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. 

To request a transfer of credit, the student must complete an application in the 
Graduate School Office. It will be the applicant's responsibility to request from the 



22 



appropriate institution(s) a statement certifying that the work is acceptable as credit 
toward a comparable degree. The transcript should then be sent to the Graduate School 
Office of A. and T. State University. 

FINAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

At least 45 days before a candidate expects to complete all work for the graduate 
degree, the candidate should file in the Graduate office an application for a final exami- 
nation. 

1. All graduate students are required to pass a written comprehensive examination in 
their area of specialty. 

In the case of Engineering students, the School of Engineering will recommend to 
the graduate school whether or not this comprehensive examination will be oral or 
written. 

2. Students pursuing a degree of M.S. in Education, subject-matter oriented, will 
take a comprehensive examination in two parts, subject-matter and professional 
education. The evaluation will be made by the faculties in the respective areas. 

3. If a student fails a comprehensive examination twice, he/she must petition for a 
third examination. The petition is reviewed by a committee from the student's 
major concentration. A student who fails a third time is dismissed from the degree 
program. 

4. Comprehensive examinations are to be scheduled by the departments, with the 
approval of the Graduate Office. A report of the student's performance must be 
submitted to the Graduate Office at least three weeks prior to Commencement. 

OPTIONS FOR DEGREE PROGRAM 

The student, in consultation with his/her adviser, selects the degree program to be 
followed. The adviser must notify the chairperson of the department of the program 
plan which the candidate prefers to follow. 

Thesis Option 

In order for a student to pursue a thesis program, he/she must be recommended to 
the Dean of the Graduate School by his/her adviser and the chairperson of the depart- 
ment in which a student is concentrating his/her studies. The Graduate School must 
then approve the student as a candidate. The thesis program consists of thirty semester 
hours including the thesis. After receiving written approval to follow the thesis option, 
the candidate shall prepare and present the thesis proposal to the adviser. Upon the 
request of the adviser, the Dean of the Graduate School shall appoint a Thesis Proposal 
Committee and shall fix a time of meeting. Following acceptance of the proposal, the 
adviser must submit to the Dean of the Graduate School an approved copy of the 
proposal in its final form. Individuals who have been granted the privilege of following 
the thesis option are expected to demonstrate research competencies and to prepare a 
scholarly account of resulting data. 

Non-Thesis Option 

The non-thesis plan is offered to the candidate who may benefit more from a broader 
range of studies than from the preparation of a thesis. The program of study must consist 
of a minimum of 30 credit hours of prescribed courses. 

Individuals who are following this plan must demonstrate their ability to conduct and 
to report the results of original research by preparing a paper as a part of the course 
Special Problems or Research or Seminar in the appropriate area. 

Thesis Option [Master of Science in Engineering] 

In order for a student to pursue a thesis program, he/she must be recommended to 



23 



the Dean of the Graduate School by the Dean of the School of Engineering. The 
Graduate School must then approve the student as a candidate. The thesis program 
consists of thirty semester hours including the thesis. After receiving written approval 
to follow the thesis option, the candidate shall prepare and present the thesis proposal 
to the chairperson of his/her Advisory Committee. Following acceptance of the pro- 
posal, an approved copy of the proposal in its final form must be submitted to the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

The Non-Thesis Option [Master of Science in Engineering] 

The non-thesis plan is offered to the candidate who may benefit more from a broader 
range of studies than from the preparation of a thesis. The program of study must consist 
of a minimum of 33 credit hours of prescribed courses. 

MASTERS THESIS AND FORMAT 

The following regulations for a Master's thesis and the format of the thesis: 

1. A student writing a thesis must register for the course, Thesis, prior to the semes- 
ter in which he/she expects to take the final examination. 

2. Three typewritten copies of the completed thesis must be submitted to the Dean 
of the Graduate School, together with two copies of an abstruct of the thesis. The 
abstract should be 400 to 500 words. Consult the Graduate School's calendar for 
deadline dates regarding submission of these manuscripts. 

3. Additional information concerning the format is available in the Graduate School 
Office. 

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION 

A candidate for graduation must file an application for graduation at least 30 days 
prior to the close of the session in which he/she expects to complete the requirements 
for the degree. A student secures the application forms from his/her advisor, who must 
approve the application before it is sent to the Graduate School Office. Failure to meet 
the deadline may result in delay of graduation for the candidate. 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION 

The Graduate Record Examination is required of all students who desire to become 
candidates for the Master of Science degree. Information concerning the time, place, 
and cost of the examination may be obtained from the office of the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

SECOND MASTERS DEGREE 

The Graduate School of North Carolina A. and T. State University provides an oppor- 
tunity for a student holding a Master's degree to earn a second Master's degree in 
another discipline or specialty. To be admitted for a second Master's degree, the 
student files the appropriate admission application, submits transcripts and provides 
pertinent examination scores. 

During the first semester, the student makes application for candidacy. In the last 
semester of courses, the student files for the comprehensive examination in the new 
specialty. In collaboration with the advisor, the student plans the new program to 
include a minimum of 18 semester hours in the new specialty to be taken in the Univer- 
sity. Twelve hours will be accepted from the first Master's providing that degree was 
completed at North Carolina A. and T. State University. If the student is a transfer 
student, twenty four hours must be completed in the new program since University 
regulations allow only six semester hours to be accepted in transfer credits. 



24 



ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY CONCERNING CHANGES IN 

REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Generally, a student is permitted to graduate according to the requirements speci- 
fied either in the catalogue current during the year of his/her first application for 
candidacy or in the catalogue current during the year of his/her application for gradua- 
tion. If more than six years pass between the student's application for candidacy and his 
application for graduation, the university reserves the right to require the student to 
satisfy the regulations in effect at the time of his/her application for graduation. In all 
instances, the Graduate School reserves the right to require students in programs in 
Agricultural Education, Education, or Industrial Education to satisfy the requirements 
specified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction at the time of the 
Student's completion of the requirements for the Master of Science degree. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Diplomas are awarded only at the commencement exercises following the completion 
of all requirements for the degree. Attendance at Commencement is required of all 
graduating students unless individually excused by the Dean of the Graduate School. 

ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS 

Additional rules, regulations, and standards for each of the areas of graduate study 
appear in the appropriate sections of the catalogue. The prospective student should 
read such sections with care. 

DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION AND 
POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION 

Henry T. Cameron, Acting Chairperson 
Room 112, Hodgin Hall 

The objectives of the Department of Administration, Supervision and Postsecondary 
Education are to offer graduate level programs of preparation in educational adminis- 
tration and supervision and postsecondary education. The masters degree programs in 
administration and supervision are consistent with state adopted competency based 
guidelines and lead to North Carolina certification at the Administrator I and Curricu- 
lum-Instructional Specialist I levels. The Department also offers programs of certifica- 
tion for those students who already hold a masters degree in education with 
certification in other professional areas. The graduate program is designed to prepare 
students for positions in administration, supervision and teaching or administration 
primarily at the community college and technical institute levels. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Education — Administration — M.S. 
Education — Supervision — M.S. 
Certification in Administration 

Certification in Supervision (Curriculum Instructional Specialist) 
GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Requirements for admission to degree programs in the Department of Administra- 
tion, Supervision and Postsecondary Education are as follows: 

1. Baccalaureate degree from an accredited undergraduate institution 

2. Class "A" Certificate in area of concentration 



25 



3. Satisfactory completion of all graduate school requirements for admission to can- 
didacy for a degree 
Under policies of the Graduate School, candidacy for a degree requires the following: 

1. The Qualifying Essay 

2. The Graduate Record Examination (aptitude and advanced test in education) 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

The major in both Administration and Curriculum-Instructional Specialist must 
complete thirty semester hours of university work for the graduate degree and must 
maintain an overall graduate point average of 3.0. 

Students who already hold a masters degree and seek certification only must meet all 
program requirements for certification, including a minimum of twelve semester hours 
in the department. 

All students, both degree candidates and certification candidates already holding a 
masters degree, must satisfactorily complete the Departmental Comprehensive Exam- 
ination in the area of certification sought. 

Before enrolling in a degree program or a program of certification, each student is 
required to meet with the departmental chairperson and to be assigned a faculty advisor 
who will be responsible for approval of the student's program of studies. The student 
who holds a masters degree and seeks certification only must submit a transcript of his/ 
her graduate studies to the departmental chairperson prior to, or at the time of, the 
initial conference. 

ACCREDITATION 

The graduate degree programs in administration and supervision are approved by the 
North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction, National Council for Accredi- 
tation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Commission on College of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduate degree and certification programs qualify the student for the principalship 
and/or supervisory positions at the elementary and secondary school levels. The pro- 
gram in postsecondary education is designed to meet the needs of administrative, 
supervisory and teaching personnel at the community college and technical institute 



CURRICULUM GUIDE 

Administration: 31 Semester Hours Required 

This program is designed for students who are interested in qualifying for State 
Certification as Administrator I (the principal's certification). Completion of this pro- 
gram does not qualify one for the graduate teaching certificate. 

Students pursuing certification, but not the masters degree are required to complete 
at least 12 semester hours at this University. 

Education 761, Organization and Administration, is a prerequisite for all other pro- 
fessional courses in the specific areas of organization, administration, curriculum, in- 
struction and supervision (items lb and lc in the requirements outlined below). 

1. Courses 

a. Foundations in Education — 3 hours 
320-726 Educational Psychology or 
311-701 Philosophy of Education 

b. Organization and Administration — 6 hours selected from: 
312-760 The Junior High School 

312-761 Organization and Administration of Schools 



26 



312-762 The Principalship 

c. Curriculum, Instruction and Supervision — 6 hours selected from: 
310-720 Curriculum Development 

312-755 Supervision of Instruction 
312-756 Supervision of Student Teachers 

d. Cognate Disciplines — 6 hours selected from: 
Economics 

Political Science 

Sociology 

Anthropology 

e. Internship — Administrative Field Experience — 3 hours 
312-769 Problems in Educational Administration 

f. Six (6) hours electives 
2. Other Requirements 

a. GRE (aptitude and advanced test in education) 

b. Masters Comprehensive in Education and Administration 

c. Overall grade point average of 3.0 for all graduate courses 

Curriculum Instructional Specialist 
31-34 Semester Hours Required 

For the Curriculum Instructional Specialist's I (masters degree) Certificate, the 
State of North Carolina requires five (5) years of teaching and/or supervisory or ad- 
ministrative experience within the past eight years. A student will not be recommen- 
ded for the North Carolina Instructional Specialist's Certificate without the minimum 
five (5) years of experience specified above. 

Requirements for Unconditional Admission: 

1. Baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution 

2. Overall grade point average of 2.6 in undergraduate studies 

3. Class "A" Certificate (or qualification for such certificate) 

4. Failure to meet any of these criteria may cause rejection of the applicant or may 
require additional undergraduate work to satisfy the requirements. 

Courses in Education and Psychology — 15 semester hours 

1. Supervision — 3 hours required 
312-755 Supervision of Instruction 

312-757 Problems in Supervision in the Elementary School 
312-758 Problems in High School Supervision 

2. Curriculum — 3 hours required 
310-720 Curriculum Development 

310-721 Curriculum in the Elementary School 
310-722 Curriculum in the Secondary School 

3. The Nature of Learning and the Learning Process — 3 hours required 
320-635 Educational Psychology and Learning 

320-726 Educational Psychology 
311-727 Child Growth and Development 

4. Organization and Administration — 4 hours required 

312-761 — Organization and Administration of Schools (Prerequisite) 

5. Educational Research — 3 hours required 
312-790 Seminar in Educational Problems 

Required courses in subject matter to qualify for issuance of the graduate teacher's 
certificate — early childhood or intermediate, or secondary — 12-18 semester hours. 

Electives — If 12 semester credit hours are used to satisfy the above, 3 hours may be 
used as electives to meet the particular needs of the student. 

Other Requirements 

1. Qualifying Examination 

2. Graduate Record Examination 



27 



3. Masters Comprehensive Examination in Education 

4. Masters Comprehensive Examination in Supervision 

5. Overall grade point average of 3. for all graduate courses 

Total number of hours required 31-34 (31 for those completing work for the 
supervisor's program at the Early Childhood Education level and the Intermediate 
Education level). 

FACULTY 

Charles E. Bailey, Jr., B.A., J.C. Smith University; M.S., N.C. A&T State University; 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut; Associate Professor of Education 

Marion Blair, B.S., A&T College; M.A., Seton Hall University; Ed.D., Indiana Uni- 
versity; Professor 

Henry T. Cameron, B.S., South Carolina State College; M.A., Fairfield University; 
Ed.D., University of Massachusetts, Associate Professor 

Lewis C. Dowdy, A.B., Allen University, Columbia, S.C.; M.A., Indiana State Col- 
lege; Ed.D., Indiana University; Professor of Education, Chancellor Emeritus 

WinfredJ. House, A. B., M.A., Ed.D., Duke University; Professor 

Samuel J. Shaw, B.S., Fayetteville State College; M.A., North Carolina College; 
Ph. D. , The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Professor and Dean, School 
of Education 

Albert E. Smith, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., George Williams 
College; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Professor 

Sullivan Welborne, B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Greensboro, Assistant Professor 

COURSES 

312-690 The Community College and Postsecondary Education 

312-763 Public School Administration 

312-764 Pupil Personnel Administration 

312-765 School Community Belations and Communication 

312-766 School Planning 

312-767 Public School Finance 

312-768 Principles of School Law 

312-771 Program Development: Community Education 

312-772 Program Management: Community Education 

312-776 Principles of College Teaching 

312-777 Seminar in Postsecondary Education 

312-778 Student Personnel Services 

312-779 Technical Education in Community Junior Colleges 

312-781 Internship (Community College Technical Institute) 



DEPARTMENT OF ADULT EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY 

SERVICES 

Office: Adult Education (Kent Court) 

B. W. Harris, Chairperson 



FOCUS: 

The general aim of the Master of Science in Adult Education program is to prepare 
present and prospective teachers of adult learners so that they will be capable of 
performing this role assignment. Emphasis is placed on the development of those 
competencies which are necessary for teaching the adult more effectively. 



28 



OBJECTIVES: 

Upon completion of the program, graduates will be expected to demonstrate these 
skills or competencies: 

1. A broad understanding of and familiarity with the general field of adult education, 
i.e., concepts, theories, and teaching methods. 

2. Ability to construct a curriculum involving the learners and relevant resources. 

3. Ability to conduct (teach) a meaningful teaching-learning experience. 

4. An understanding of an ability to evaluate a teaching-learning experience. 

5. A perception which indicates a holistic and interdisciplinary view regarding adult/ 
continuing education. 

6. Capability to make a thorough assessment of the needs of adults. 

7. The ability to define and formulate behavioral learning objectives. 

DEGREE OFFERED: 

Adult Education — M.S. 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS: 

The admission of students to the graduate degree program in the Department of 
Adult Education and Community Services is based upon the general admission re- 
quirements of the University. 

DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS: 

A minimum of 30 hours with thesis or 33 hours without thesis and at least a 3.0 
average on a 4.0 scale. At least 50% of the courses counted toward the graduate degree 
must be of courses offered to graduate students only, i.e., courses numbered 700-799. 
Each graduate student is expected to complete satisfactorily an adult teaching practi- 
cum under supervision. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES: 

Students who earn the degree in Adult Education may look forward to careers in such 
endeavors as Agricultural Extension, Adult Basic Education, Community College Edu- 
cation, Religious Education, Law Enforcement, Continuing Education, Nursing, and 
Community School Education. 

CURRICULUM FOR MAJOR IN ADULT EDUCATION 

Description Credit 

Introduction to Adult Education 3 
Methods in Adult Education 3 
Adult Development and Learning 3 
Gerontology 3 
History and Philosophy of Adult/Continuing Education 3 
Organization, Administration and Supervision of Adult Edu- 
cation Programs 3 
Practicum in Teaching Adults 3 
Seminar on Contemporary Issues in Adult/Continuing Educa- 
tion 1 
Independent Study 2 
Thesis Research (Optional) 3 
Teaching the Culturally Disadvantaged Learner 3 
The Community College and Post Secondary Education 3 
Methods and Techniques of Research 3 
Seminar in Education Problems 3 
Adult Education in Occupational Education 3 

29 



Course 




A.E. 


651 


A.E. 


652 


A.E. 


653 


A.E. 


654 


A.E. 


700 


A.E. 


701 


A.E. 


702 


A.E. 


703 


A.E. 


704 


A.E. 


705 


Edu. 


641 


Edu. 


690 


Edu. 


710 


Edu. 


790 


Ag.Ed. 


601 



SSS . 669 Small Groups 3 

A.E. 650 Special Problems in Adult Education 1-4 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

Adult Education 

Sampson Buie, B.S., North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University; 
M.S., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Assistant Professor. 

Benjamin W. Harris, B.S., North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Univer- 
sity; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ed.D., North Carolina State University, 
Professor 

COURSES: 

340-650 Special Problems in Adult Education 

340-651 Introduction to Adult Education 

340-652 Methods in Adult Education 

340-653 Adult Development and Learning 

340-654 Gerontology 

340-700 History and Philosophy of Adult/Continuing Education 

340-701 Organization, Administration and Supervision of Adult Education Programs 

340-702 Practicum in Teaching Adults 

340-703 Seminar on Contemporary Issues in Adult/Continuing Education 

340-704 Independent Study 

340-705 Thesis Research (Optional) 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Sidney H. Evans, Chairperson 
Office: 251 Carver Hall 

The department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology offers a program of 
study leading toward the Master of Science degree in Agricultural Economics. The 
program prepares students for careers in teaching, research, extension, agriculture- 
related business, and government service, as well as for further graduate studies for a 
terminal degree. Students may select a program track for concentration in Agricultural 
Marketing, Production Economics or Rural Development. 

A minimum of 30 semester hours are required for the M.Sc. degree in Agricultural 
Economics, including 12 semester hours of "core" courses in advanced Economics, 
Statistics and Research Methods required of all Candidates, 9 semester hours of 
courses in the selected program track, and 6 semester hours of thesis work. In addition, 
the successful completion and defense of a thesis and a comprehensive examination are 
required. 

The general requirement for admission is an undergraduate degree from an accredi- 
ted institution, with a grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 point scale) and a basic 
preparation in Agricultural Economics, Economics, Mathematics and Statistics. An 
undergraduate major in Agricultural Economics, Economics, Agribusiness or Business 
Administration, with preparation in Economics/Statistics generally will provide an 
acceptable preparation. Applicants who do not meet these requirements will be consid- 
ered on an individual basis. 

The student pursuing the Master of Science degree in Agricultural Economics is 
required to complete a common core of courses consisting of: 

Ag Econ 710 Advanced Micro Economics 3 Semester Hours 

Ag Econ 720 Advanced Macro Economics 3 Semester Hours 

Ag Econ 705 Advanced Statistics 3 Semester Hours 

Ag Econ 725 Research Methods 3 Semester Hours 



30 



In addition, the following courses are required by areas of concentration as specified: 

Rural Development 

Core courses 

Ag Econ 750 Social Organization of Agriculture 

Ag Econ 730 Rural Development 

Ag Econ 732 Agricultural Policy 

Elective 

Thesis 



Total 



Agricultural Marketing 

Core Courses 

Ag Econ 734 Agricultural Marketing 

Ag Econ 656 Agricultural Price Analysis 

Ag Econ 736 Marketing Problems and Issues 

Elective 

Thesis 

Production Economics 

Core courses 

Ag Econ 740 Production Economics 

Ag Econ 732 Agricultural Policy 

Ag Econ 708 Econometrics 

Elective 

Thesis 



Total 



12 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
6 Semester Hours 

30 Semester Hours 



12 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
6 Semester Hours 

30 Semester Hours 



Total 



12 Semester 
3 Semester 
3 Semester 
3 Semester 
3 Semester 
6 Semester 

30 Semester 



Hours 
Hours 
Hours 
Hours 
Hours 
Hours 
Hours 



DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Sidney H. Evans, B.S., Virginia State College; M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University; Professor 

Hari P. Marhatta, B. Comm., Tribhuvan University; M. Comm., Tribhuvan Univer- 
sity; M.S., North Dakota State University; Ph.D., University of Connnecticut; 
Associate Professor. 

Albert O. Yeboah, B.S., University of Ghana; M.S., University of Guelph; M.A., 
Ph. D. , University of Wisconsin; Adjunct Assistant Professor. 

Anthony K. Yeboah, B.S., University of Science and Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa 
State University; Adjunct Assistant Professor. 

Donald R. McDowell, B.S., Southern University A. and M., M.S., University of Illi- 
nois; Adjunct Instructor. 

COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND RURAL 
SOCIOLOGY 



COURSES 

150-650. Human Resource Development 

150-656. Agricultural Price Analysis 

150-705. Econometrics 

150-710. Micro Economics 

150-720. Macro Economics 

150-725. Research Methods in Agricultural Economics 

150-730. Rural Development 



CREDIT 

Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 



31 



150-732. Agricultural Policy Credit 3(3-0) 

150-734. Agricultural Marketing Credit 3(3-0) 

150-735. Economic Development Credit 3(3-0) 

150-736. Agricultural Marketing Problems and Issues Credit 3(3-0) 

150-738. International Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

150-740. Production Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

150-750. Social Organization of Agriculture Credit 3(3-0) 

150-798. Thesis Research I Credit 3(3-0) 

150-799. Thesis Research II Credit 3(3-0) 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

A.P. Bell, Chairperson 
Office: 242 Carver Hall 

The Department of Agricultural Education and Extension offers programs leading to 
the Master of Science Degree. The programs are designed to meet the needs of individ- 
ual students and emphasize the professional improvement of teachers, agricultural 
extension personnel and professional workers in related areas with educational respon- 
sibilities. They provide advanced preparation for employment in administration, su- 
pervision, teacher education, and research in agricultural education and related fields. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Agricultural Education — M.S. 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Admission of students to the Master's Degree Program in Agricultural Education is 
based on the general admission requirements of the Graduate School. The candidate 
must have a Baccalaureate Degree from an accredited undergraduate institution. He/ 
she must have a minimum of 18 credits in professional education or certification as a 
teacher of agricultural education or equivalent professional experiences. Failure to 
meet any of these criteria may necessitate rejection of the application or requirement of 
additional undergraduate work. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of 33 semester hours are required. The degree is not conferred for a mere 
collection of credits. A well-balanced, unified, and complete program of study will be 
required. A student may meet the degree requirements by either full-time or part-time 
enrollment and by attendance in any combination of terms. 

The student may follow a thesis or non-thesis program. Those candidates who do not 
write a thesis must present a suitable investigative paper. Its nature and content shall 
be determined by the department. 

Courses in the major and minor areas will be selected on the basis of the individual's 
needs and interests. To qualify for the graduate certificate to teach in the public schools 
of North Carolina the candidate should complete 18 semester credits in subject matter 
agriculture. The candidate may concentrate in one subject matter area. 

Other requirements include: Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test and Ad- 
vanced Test in Education), 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses, and Final 
Comprehensive Examination in Agricultural Education. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

The Graduate Program in Agricultural Education provides advanced preparation for 
employment in administration, supervision, teaching in school and colleges, agricul- 
tural extension, business and industry, and research in agricultural education and 
related fields. 

32 



DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

Arthur P. Bell, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., & Ed.D., The 

Pennsylvania State University; Professor 
Willie T. Ellis, B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Cornell 

University, Professor 
William E. Beed, B.S., Southern University; M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., 

Cornell University, Professor 
Isaac C. Bogers, B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; 

Ed.D., The University of Sarasota; Adjunct Associate Professor 

COURSES 

110-601 Adult Education in Vocational and Extension Education 

110-603 Problem Teaching in Agricultural Education 

110-604 Public Belations in Vocational Agriculture 

110-605 Guidance and Group Instruction in Vocational Education 

110-606 Cooperative Work-Study Programs 

110-607 Environmental Education 

110-608 Agricultural Extension Organization and Methods 

110-609 Community Analysis and Bural Life 

110-664 Occupational Exploration for Middle Grades 

110-665 Occupational Exploration in the Middle Grades — Agricultural Occupations 

110-700 Seminar in Agricultural Education 

110-702 Methods and Techniques of Public Belations 

110-703 Scientific Methods in Besearch 

110-704 History and Philosophy of Vocational Education 

110-705 Becent Developments and Trends in Agricultural Education 

110-706 Comparative Education in Agriculture 

110-707 Issues in Community Development and Adult Education 

110-750 Community Problems 

110-752 Administration and Supervision 

110-753 Program Planning 

110-754 History of Agricultural Education 

110-760 Thesis Besearch in Agricultural Education 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

George A. Johnson, Chairperson 

Office: Ward Hall 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Courses Offered for Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

120-601. Principles of Animal Nutrition 
(Formerly A. H. 1371) 

120-602. Animal Science Seminar 
(Formerly A. H. 1372) 

120-603. Advanced Livestock Management 
(Formerly A. H. 1373) 

For Graduate Students Only 

120-690. Selection of Meat and Meat Products 
(Formerly A. H. 1385) 

120-702. Advanced Livestock Marketing 

120-703. Advanced Livestock Production 

33 



DAIRY SCIENCE 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

120-604. Dairy Seminar I 

(Formerly Dairy Husb. 2374) 

120-605. Dairy Seminar II 

ART 

LeRoy F. Holmes, Chairperson 
Office: Frazier Hall 

The Department of Art Prepares personnel at the graduate level by offering the 
Master's degree in Education with a concentration in art. Specifically the Department 
of Art seeks to prepare personnel by providing knowledge and competencies needed in 
planning, organizing, and supervising various aspects of the public school art program. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Art, Secondary Education — M.S. 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the graduate program in the Department of Art is based 
upon general admission requirements of the University. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree 
program in Education, a student wishing to be accepted as a candidate for the degree, 
Master of Science in Education with a concentration in art, must hold or be qualified to 
hold a "Class A" teaching certificate in art. The areas covered should be: painting, 
ceramics or sculpture, design, art history, and crafts. Each applicant for admission is 
required to submit a portfolio of his/her work. 

A student who fails to meet these qualifications will be expected to satisfy these 
requirements by enrolling in appropriate undergraduate courses before beginning his/ 
her graduate studies in art. 

Requirements For The M.S. Degree in Education 
(Concentration in Art) 

Minimum requirements for the M.S. degree in Education with a concentration in art; 
30 Semester Hours. 

I. Education — (6 Semester Hours) 

A. Education 701 (Philosopy of Education): 3 Semester Hours 

B. Education 722 (Curriculum in Secondary School): 3 Semester Hours 

II. Art — (9 Semester Hours) 

A. Art 720 (Methods of Criticism); 3 Semester Hours 

B. Art 721 (Research and Analysis): 3 Semester Hours 

C. Art 722 (Seminar in Art Education): 3 Semester Hours 

III. Other Requirements 

A. Electives (6 Semester Hours in Art, Education, or related fields. 

B. Additional 9 Semester Hours from: 

1. Art 603 — Studio Techniques — 3 Semester Hours 

2. Art 604 — Ceramics Workshop — 2 Semester Hours 

3. Art 605 — Printmaking — 3 Semester Hours 

4. Art 606 — Sculpture — 3 Semester Hours 

5. Art 607 — Project Seminar — 2 Semester Hours 

6. Art 608 — Arts and Crafts — 3 Semester Hours 

34 



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

The program offered by the Department of Art prepares competent personnel for 
careers in the areas of teaching art, art research, creative productions, and various 
administrative positions in the visual arts. 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

Art 

LeRoy F. Holmes, Jr. , A. B. , Howard University; A. B. , Harvard University; Associate 

Professor 
Theresa A. McGeady, A.B., Immaculata College; M. A., M.F.A., University of Notre 

Dame: Ph.D., Ohio University; Associate Professor 
James E. McCoy, B.S., North Carolina College; M. A., Columbia University; Assistant 

Professor 
Stephanie A. Santmyers, B.F.A., Alfred University; M.S., Illinois State University; 

Instructor 
Henry E. Sumpter, B.S., North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University; 

M.F.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Visiting Lecturer 

COURSES 

211-600 Public School Art 

211-602 Seminar in Art History 

211-603 Studio Techniques 

211-604 Ceramics Workshops 

211-605 Printmaking 

211-606 Sculpture 

211-607 Project Seminar 

211-608 Arts and Crafts 

211-720 Methods of Criticism, Interpretation, and Research 

211-721 Research and Analysis 

211-722 Seminar in Art Education 



BIOLOGY 

Arthur Hicks, Chairperson 
Office: 102 Barnes Hall 

The Department of Biology's program is designed to produce investigators and 
teachers who can define, experimentally research, and communicate fundamental 
problems associated with the development of biological systems. Further, the program 
of study leading to the Master's degree is designed to broaden the studies of biology 
majors who intend to pursue additional study at the graduate level. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Biology — M.S. 

Biology — M.S., Secondary Education 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the graduate degree programs in the Department of 
Biology is based upon the general admission requirements of the University. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 
Biology Major 

In addition to the general requirements specified below, a student wishing to be 

35 



accepted as a candidate for the degree, Master of Science in Biology, must have com- 
pleted, on the undergraduate level, chemistry through organic, calculus, or at least a 
math course containing some calculus, one year of physics, and a course in cellular or 
molecular biology. Some graduate students may be accepted with the provision that 
they complete some or all of these courses before acceptance to candidacy. The student 
is advised to read the Graduate Catalog very carefully for any additional Graduate 
School or departmental requirements . 

I. Required Coursed (30 semester hours, including thesis research) 
Biology 663 Cytology (3) 

668 Animal Behavior (3) 

669 Recent Advances in Cell Biology (3) 
743 Developmental Plant Morphology (3) 

Chemistry 651 General Biochemistry (5) 
Biology 701 Biology Seminar (1) 

702 Biology Seminar (1) 

862 Research in Botany (6) 
or 

863 Research in Zoology (6) 

Hours needed to complete the 30 s.h. required may be taken from the following 
courses: 

Biology 666 Experimental Embryology (3) 

742 Physiology of Vascular Plants (3) 
700 Environmental Biology (3) 
769 Cellular Physiology (4) 
861 Advanced Genetics (3) 

703 Experimental Methods in Biology (3) 
860 Parasitology (3) 

NOTE: On some occasions substitutions may be made in the second half of this list in 
order to meet specific needs and/or interests of the graduate student or department. 
II. Other Requirements 

a. Filing for and completion of Qualifying Essay — (a requirement of the Gradu- 
ate School) 

b. GRE (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test in Biology) Scores must be submitted 
to the Graduate School Office before admission to the final examination can be 
granted 

c. Satisfactory completion of an examination in a foreign language 

d. One academic year of residence at A & T 

e. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

f. Participation in the Departmental Seminar Series 

g. Final comprehensive examination in Biology 
h. Satisfactory presentation and defense of thesis 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR A MAJOR IN BIOLOGY 
(Pre-professional) 

FIRST YEAR 
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

Credit 

Bio. 669 Recent Adv. in Cell Biology (3) Bio. 663 Cytology (3) 

Bio. 743 Dev. Plant Morphology (3) Bio. 668 Animal Behavior (3) 

Bio. 701 Bio. Seminar (1) Bio. 702 Bio. Seminar (1) 

Bio. 703 Exp. Methods in Biology (3) Chem. 651 General Biochem. (5) 
Elective 

10 (+ elect.) 12 



36 



SECOND YEAR 

SUMMER or FIRST SEMESTER FIRST SEMESTER OR SECOND SE- 
MESTER 

Bio. 862 Research in Botany (3) Bio. 862 Research in Bot. (3) 

or or 

Bio. 863 Research in Zoology (3) Bio. 863 Research in Zoo (3) 

Elective (Optional) Elective (Optional) 

3(+ elect.) 3(+ elect.) 

Teaching Major in Biology 

In addition to the general requirements specified below, a student wishing to be 
accepted as a candidate for the degree, Master of Science in Education with concentra- 
tion in Biology must have completed, on the undergraduate level, chemistry through 
organic, a math course which includes some calculus and one year of college physics. 

Required Courses/M.S. in Education/Concentration in Biology 

I. Required Courses in biology: Non-thesis Option (30 s.h.) 

A. Biology 661 Mammalian biology (3) 

662 Biology of Sex (3) 

663 Cytology (3) 

700 Environmental Biology (3) 

765 Introductory Experimental Zoology (3) 

766 Invertebrate Biology/Elementary And 
Secondary School Teachers (3) 

NOTE: 760 Projects in Biology (3) and 

Seminar in Biology (2) may be substituted 
701/702 for Biology 766 

B. Six semester hours of electives in education, biology, or subjects related to 
biology 

II. Required Courses in Biology: Thesis Option (30 s.h.) 

A. Biology 661 Mammalian Biology (3) 

662 Biology of Sex (3) 

663 Cytology (3) 

700 Environmental Biology (3) 

765 Introductory Experimental Zoology (3) 

862 Research in Botany (3) or 

863 Research in Zoology (3) 

B. Three hours of electives in education, biology or related fields 

C. Thesis 

III. Required Courses in Education — Non-thesis Option (30 s.h.) 

1. Research 

2. The Nature of the Learner and the Learning Process 

3. Current Critical Issues in American Education 

4. Historical, Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education 

5. Curriculum, Supervision, etc. 

IV. Other Requirements 

A. Students in a non-thesis program may take either Education 790 (Seminar) or 
a seminar in the area of concentration. Students in a thesis program may take 
Education 791 (Thesis) or a thesis research course offered in the area of 
concentration. In all instances, the decision is to be made in consultation with 
the advisor. 

B. Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test and Advanced Test in area of 
concentration) 



37 



C. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

D. Final comprehensive examination in Education and area of concentration 

E. Must hold or be qualified to hold a Class A teaching certificiate in Biology 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR A TEACHING MAJOR IN 

BIOLOGY 

NON-THESIS 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Bio. 661 Mammalian Bio. 
Bio. 662 Biology of Sex 
Bio. 700 Environmental Bio. 
Bio. 701 Bio. Seminar 
Education 



FIRST YEAR 





SECOND SEMESTER 




(3) 


Bio. 663 Cytology 


(3) 


(3) 


Bio. 765 Intro. Experiment. Zoo 


(3) 


(3) 


Bio. 766 Invert. Bio. For Teach. 


(3) 


(1) 


Bio. 702 Bio. Sem. 


(1) 


(3) 


Education 


(3) 


13 




13 



SUMMER 

Bio. Elective 
Education Elective 
Education 790 (3) (if required) 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Bio. 661 Mammalian Bio. 
Bio. 662 Bio. of Sex 
Bio. 700 Environ. Bio. 
Bio. 701 Bio. Sem. 



THESIS 




RSTYEAR 




SECOND SEMESTER 




(3) Bio. 663 Cytology 


(3) 


(3) Bio. 765 Intro. Exp. Zoology 


(3) 


(3) Education or 


(3) 


(1) Biology Elective 


(3) 


10 


9 



SECOND YEAR 

SUMMER OR FIRST SEMESTER 

Bio. 862 Research in Bot. (3) 



or 



Bio. 863 Research in Zoo. 
Elective (Optional) 



(3) 



3(+ elect.) 
DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

BIOLOGY 

David W. Aldridge, B.S., M.S., University of Texas, Arlington; Ph.D., Syracuse Uni- 
versity; Visiting Assistant Professor 

Jerry Bennett, B.S., Tougaloo College; M.S., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Iowa State 
University; Associate Professor 

A. James Hicks, B.S., Tougaloo College; Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana; Associ- 
ate Professor 

Alfred Hill, Jr., B.S., Prairieview College; M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., 
Kansas State University; Professor 

Thomas L. Jordan, B.A., Rockhurst College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 
Madison; Assistant Professor 

Eugene Marrow, B.S., A & T State University; M.S., Ph.D., Catholic University of 
America; Professor 



38 



Randy G. Martin, B.A., M.A., Miami University; Ph.D., Florida State University; 

Assistant Professor 
Alphonso R. Vick, A.B., Johnson C. Smith University; M.S. North Carolina Central 

University; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Syracuse University; Professor 
Joseph J. White, B.S., M.S., North Carolina College at Durham; Ph.D., University of 

Illinois, Urbana; Professor 

James A. Williams, A.B., Talladega College; M.S., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Brown 

University; Professor 

GRADUATE 
COURSES OFFERED IN THE BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

DEPT. BIOLOGY Credits 

221 600 General Science for Elementary School Teachers 3 

221 700 Environmental Biology 3 

221 701 Biological Seminar 1 

221 702 Biological Seminar 1 

222 703 Experimental Methods in Biology 3 
221 704 Seminar in Biology 3 

221 760 Projects in Biology 3 

222 761 Seminar in Biology 1 

BOTANY 

221 640 Plant Biology 3 

221 642 Special Problems in Botany 3 

221 739 Radio-isotope Techniques and Radiotracer Methods 4 

221 740 Essentials of Plant Anatomy 3 

221 741 Applied Plant Ecology 3 

221 742 Physiology of Vascular Plants 3 

221 743 Development Plant Morphology 3 

221 744 Plant Nutrition 3 

ZOOLOGY 

221 659 Foundational Radiobiology 3 

221 660 Special Problems in Zoology 3 

221 661 Mammalian Biology 3 

221 662 Biology of Sex 3 

221 663 Cytology 3 

221 664 Histo-Chemical Technique 3 

221 665 Nature Study 3 

221 666 Experimental Embryology 3 

221 667 Animal Biology 3 

221 668 Animal Behavior 3 

221 669 Recent Advances in Cell Biology 3 

221 762 Applied Invertebrate Zoology 3 

221 763 Fundamentals of Vertebrate Morphology 3 

221 764 Basic Protozoology 3 

221 765 Introductory Experimental Zoology 3 
221 766 Vertebrate Biology for Elementary and Secondary 

School Teachers 3 

221 767 Genetics and Inheritance for the Secondary School Teacher 3 

221 768 Functional Invertebrate Zoology 3 

221 769 Cellular Physiology 4 

221 860 Parasitology 3 

221 861 Advanced Genetics 3 

221 862 Research in Botany 3 

221 863 Research in Zoology 3 

39 



CHEMISTRY 

Walter G. Wright, Acting Chairperson 
Office: Room 116 Hines Hall 

The objectives of the Graduate Division in Chemistry are to provide the theoretical 
and experimental training experiences which are necessary for those students who are 
pursuing a Master of Science degree in Chemistry. The Department also offers special 
courses which may be used for teacher renewal certificates. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

1. Master of Science Degree in Chemistry 

2. Master of Science in Education with concentration in chemistry. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to the Graduate School under one of the following options: 

1. Unconditional admission 

2. Provisional admission 

3. Special student 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to a degree program requires the following: 

1. Baccalaureate degree from an accredited undergraduate institution. 

2. An undergraduate major in chemistry which includes one year of physical chemis- 
try and one year of differential and integral calculus. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A DEGREE 

The Master of Science degree in Chemistry has two options: 

1. Thirty semester hours including a thesis 

2. Non-thesis option requires thirty semester hours of course work. 
Master of Science degree in Education requires the following courses: 

Chemistry 611, 722, 743, 732 and 701 

In addition, five semester hours in chemistry are required including a special prob- 
lems course in analytical, inorganic, organic or Physical chemistry, and two semester 
hours of electives. 

A thesis in Chemistry or Education is also required. 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 

CHEMISTRY 

Walter G. Wright, B.S. and M.S., North Carolina Central University; Ph.D., New 
York University; Professor 

Richard Bennett, B.S., Morehouse College; Ph.D., University of California at Santa 
Barbara; Professor 

Naiter Chopra, B.Sc. Hons, M.Sc. Hons., Ph.D., University of Dublin; Professor 

William DeLauder, B.S., Morgan State University; Ph.D., Wayne State University; 
Professor, Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

Vallie Guthrie, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.A. Fisk University; 
Ed.D., American University; Associate Professor 

Evans Booker, B.S., Saint Augustine College; M.S. Tuskegee Institute; Associate Pro- 
fessor 

Arthur Stevens, B.S. Langston University; M.S., Oklahoma University; Associate Pro- 
fessor 



40 



Alex Williamson, B. S. , Jackson State; Ph. D. , University of Illinois; Assistant Professor 
Jothi Ramasamy, B. Sc. , Annamalai University, Cdm. , India; Ph. D. , Kansas State Uni- 
versity; Assistant Professor 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND 
GRADUATES 

Course Credits 

Inorganic Synthesis 2 

Advanced Inorganic 4 

Intermediate Organic Chemistry 3 

Qualitative Organic Chemistry 3 

Electroanalytical Chemistry 3 

Radiochemistry 3 

Radioisotope Techniques and Application 2 

Introduction to Quantum Mechanics 4 

General Biochemistry 5 

norganic) 

Structural Inorganic Chemistry 2 

Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry 2 

Elements of Organic Chemistry 3 

Advanced Organic Chemistry 4 

Organic Chemistry 2 

Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry 2 

Organic Preparations 1-2 

Selected Topics in Biochemistry 2 

Modern Analytical Chemistry 3 

Advanced Analytical Chemistry 4 

Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry 2 

(Physical Chemistry) 

223 741 Principles of Physical Chemistry I 4 

223 742 Principles of Physical Chemistry II 4 

223 743 Chemical Thermodynamics 4 

223 744 Chemical Spectroscopy 3 

223 746 Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry 2 

223 748 Collaid Chemistry 2 
223 749 Chemical Kinetics 

Research and Special Topics 

Seminar 1 

Chemical Research 2-5 

Special Problems in Inorganic Chemistry 2-4 

Special Problems in Organic Chemistry 2-4 

Special Problems in Analytical Chemistry 2-4 

Special Problems in Physical Chemistry 2-4 

Special Problems in Biochemistry 2-4 



Dept. No. 


Course No. 


223 


610 


223 


611 


223 


621 


223 


624 


223 


631 


223 


641 


223 


642 


223 


643 


223 


651 


Graduate Students Only (I 


223 


711 


223 


716 


(Organic) 




223 


721 


223 


722 


223 


723 


223 


726 


223 


727 


(Biochemistry) 




223 


756 


(Analytical Chemistry) 


223 


731 


223 


732 


223 


736 



223 


701 


223 


702 


223 


715 


223 


725 


223 


735 


223 


745 


223 


755 



41 



Chemical Instructions 

223 763 Selected Topics in Chemistry 6 

INSTRUCTION I 
223 764 Selected Topics in Chemistry 6 

INSTRUCTION II 
223 765 Special Problems in Chemistry 3 

INSTRUCTION I 
223 766 Special Problems in Chemistry 3 

INSTRUCTION II 
223 767 Special Problems in Chemistry 3 

INSTRUCTION III 
223 768 Special Problems in Chemisty IV 3 

THESIS RESEARCH 

233 799 Thesis Research 3 



Dept. No. Course No. Course Credit 



EDUCATIONAL MEDIA 

Tommie M. Young, Chairperson 
Office: 101 Crosby Halt 

The Program in Educational Media provides an integrated curriculum of audiovisual 
education, library science, and instructional television in the preparation of Media 
Coordinators and allied personnel to serve learning needs and instructional programs 
in school media centers, junior and senior college learning resources complexes, busi- 
ness, industry, and health service agencies. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Education, Educational Media — M.S. 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to the Graduate School of the University is prerequisite to admission to 
the Department as a Media Major. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Media Major — The major in Educational Media must complete a minimum of 30 
semester hours. Eighteen to twenty-one of these hours are to be completed in Educa- 
tional Media. Additionally, majors seeking the Graduate Certificate approved by the 
North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction are to select twelve hours of 
course work at the 700 level in the areas of: behavioral and humanities studies, relevant 
theory, and research. All majors complete the 700 level Internship and Seminar in 
Educational Media. While 30 semester hours are required to complete the Program, 
students are encouraged to strengthen the professional preparation through the selec- 
tion of appropriate electives in Media. 

Media Minor — (Associate Media Coordinator) The Associate Media Coordinator creden- 
tials approved by the State Department of Public Instruction will terminate in 1986. Students 
enrolled in this phase of the Program may utilize these courses as the Media Minor. The 
Associate Media requirements include completion of 12-15 hours in media and 3-6 hours in 
relevant theory and behavioral and humanities studies. The Media Minor is required to 
complete the Media courses only. 

Media Electives — Students preparing for careers in teaching, supervision, adminis- 

42 



tration and technical fields will find media courses especially helpful in aiding in pro- 
gram design, development and communication. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

The media program at North Carolina A. and T. provides a variety of activities in 
preparing professional media personnel for positions in a myriad of agencies and ser- 
vices. Students have the opportunity to meet in-service media specialists who speak at 
Media Seminars and share experiences and prospects for employment. Professional 
workshops that bring new ideas, technology, and personalities to the campus support 
the instructional program and enhance the student's potentials for employment. 

Over 600 public schools in North Carolina require full-time media personnel. Health 
service agencies, public communication agencies, personal training programs, junior 
and senior colleges and universities are among the many potential employers of well- 
prepared media specialists. 

Suggested Curriculum for Media Major (Media Coordinator) 
One Year Curriculum 

Fall 

602 Utilization of Education Media ^"CA ® 

603 Production of Instructional Materials /* ^fc„ (3) 
601 Reference Materials and Methods ,y % /> (3) 

* Media elective optional ~ ' Q Of n 9 

Spring l ^A, <* / . 

600 Organization of Media Collections ^5 ■-•,,.. (3) 

604 Administration of Educational Media ■*-*'. /■» t ,,-, (3) 
607 Book Selection and Related Materials for Young People * P (3) 

■^ *% 
606 Developmental Media for Children (3) 

* Media elective optional 9 

Summer 
I 
**701 Philosophy of Education (3) 

Cognate Course (3) 

6 



* * * 



II 

**755 Supervision of Instruction (3) 

703 Educational Media Internship and Seminar (3) 

6 

* Media elective option. It is recommended that Media Majors elect courses in the 
area of instructional development to support the media preparation. 
** Courses to satisfy behavioral and humanities studies may be taken from a range of 
offerings. 
* * * This cognate course may be selected from a discipline relevant to the students needs and 
interest. 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

Educational Media 

Tommie M. Young, B.A., Tennessee State University, M.A.L.S., Peabody-Vanderbilt 

University, Ph.D., Duke University, Professor 
Valena Lee, B. A., St. Augustine College, M.S., M.L.S., Indiana University Assistant 

Professor 



43 



Montez Byers, B.A., Bennett College, M.S., N.C. A&T State University, M.S.L.S., 
Atlanta University, Visiting Assistant Professor 

Marvin Duncan, B.S., N.C. Central University, Ph.D., University of Michigan, Visit- 
ing Professor 

Bichard Edwards, A.S., Southern Union Junior College, B.A., Auburn University, 
M.M.A., University of South Carolina, Adjunct Instructor 

William Peeler, B.S., M.S., N.C. A&T State University, Visiting Technician Courses 

Core Curriculum 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

350-603 Production of Instructional Materials 

350-602 Utilization of Educational Media Concentration 

350-600 Organization of Media Collections 

350-601 Beference Materials 

350-604 Administration of Educational Media 

350-605 Systems Approach and Curriculum 

350-606 Developmental Media for Children 

350-607 Book Selection and Belated Materials for Young People 

350-608 Programming for Instructional Badio and Television 

350-609 Production for Instructional Badio and Television 

350-610 Broadcasting for Instructional Badio and Television 

Graduate Courses 

350-700 Programmed Instruction 

350-701 Media Betrieval Systems 

350-702 Workshop in Educational Media 

350-703 Educational Media Internship and Seminar 

350-706 Media in Special Education and Beading 

350-715 Advanced Production in Instructional Badio and Television 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND GUIDANCE 

Wyatt D. Kirk, Chairperson 
Office: 209 Hodgin Hall 

The objective of the Educational Psychology and Guidance is designed to prepare individ- 
uals for positions in Counseling and Guidance in both educational and non-educational set- 
tings to srengthen and improve the practitioner's professional skills in the area of human 
services. The program of studies includes counseling theories and procedures, theoretical and 
practical examination of human development and changes, techniques oriented courses, and a 
heavy emphasis on supervised practice. Graduates of the program are prepared to work in a 
variety of counseling settings, middle and secondary schools, junior college, and private and 
public agencies. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Counselor Education — M.S. 

Student Personnel Worker or Agency Counselor — M.S. 

Human Besource Concentration — M.S. 

General Program Requirements 

Following acceptance by the Graduate College, the Department of Educational Psy- 
chology and Guidance will accept students once they have completed nine hours of 
course work, at which time they will be evaluated, also, based upon their undergradu- 
ate point hour ratio, and the Department Faculty recommendation process. 



44 



Also, after acceptance by the Graduate College (not the Department), each student 
indicating an interest in Educational Psychology and Guidance will be assigned an 
advisor who will assist in constructing a degree program consistent with the student's 
vocational goal and educational interest. Program development must be completed 
before evaluation for departmental acceptance at the end of nine hours. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Counselor Education Majors — the major in Counselor Education Curriculum must 
complete 36 hours of graduate courses. The prerequisites for admission to the program 
are: 1) Introduction to Guidance and/or it's equivalency, and 2) a course in Educational 
Statistics or Psychological Measurement. A minimum grade of "B" must be achieved in 
the curriculum. This program is designed for the individual who seeks issuance of a 
School Counselor's Certificate and the Master's degree. 

Student Personnel Worker or Agency Counselor — the major in Student Personnel 
Worker or Agency Curriculum must complete 36 hours of graduate courses. The pre- 
requisites for admission to the program are: 1) Introduction to Guidance, 2) Educa- 
tional Statistics, or Psychological Measurement, and 3) Personnel Management. A 
minimum grade of "B" must be achieved in the curriculum. This program is for students 
who are interested in a non-certification program and/or interested in professional 
counseling career in an agency setting and the master's degree. 

Human Resource Cencentration — the major in the Human Resource Concentration 
must complete 36 hours of graduate courses. The prerequisites for admission to the 
program are: 1) Elementary Statistics or Psychological Measurement, 2) Psychology 
445, and 3) Business Administration 522. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Traditionally, students receiving the Master's degree from Counseling and Guidance 
have found jobs in school settings (Middle and Secondary) junior colleges, public 
agencies (family services, youth services, welfare departments, and state agencies) and 
private agencies. Presently and additionally, career opportunities will include, oppor- 
tunities in manpower positions, industry and government on the local, state and na- 
tional level. 

Suggested Curriculum Guide for Major 

COUNSELOR EDUCATION 

First Year 

1st Semester Credit 2nd Semester Credit 

Introduction to Guidance 3 Educational Statistics or 

Psychological Measurements 3 

Technical Core 3 Technical Core 3 
Personality Development 3 Organization Administration 

Guidance Services 706 3 

9 9 

Second Year 

3rd Semester Credit 4th Semester Credit 

Internship in Guidance 714 3 Techniques of Individual Analysis 3 

Elective Core 3 Elective Core 3 

Introduction to Counseling 3 Principles & Dynamics of Group 

Counseling 720 3 

9 9 



45 



Third Year 



5th Semester 

Educational and Occupational 
Information 717 
Educational Psychology 726 
Guidance Practicum 730 



STUDENT PERSONNEL WORKER OR AGENCY 

First Year 



1st Semester 

Introduction to Guidance 600 
Educational Statistics or 
Psychological Measurements 
Technical Core 



3rd Semester 

Personality Development 623 



Technical Core 

Techniques of Individual Analysis 716 



Credit 2nd Semester Credit 

3 Personnel Management 522 3 

3 Technical Core 3 

3 Evaluation Methods 604 3 

9 9 

Second Year 

Credit 4th Semester Credit 

3 Educational and Occupational 

Information 717 3 

3 Introduction to Counseling 718 3 

Elective Core 3 

9 



5th Semester 

Elective Core 

Principles and Dynamics of Group 

Counseling 720 

Guidance Practicum 730 



Credit 

3 

3 
3 
9 



HUMAN RESOURCE CONCENTRATION 

First Year 
Credit 2nd Semester 



1st Semester 

Elementary Statistics/Psychological 

Measurements 

Introduction to Guidance 600 

Technical Core 



3rd Semester 

Evaluation Methods 
Technical Core 
Educational and Occupational 
Information 717 



Psychology 445 

Business Administration 522 

Personality Development 623 



Credit 

3 
3 
3 
9 



Second Year 

Credit 4th Semester Credit 

3 Techniques of Individual Analysis 716 3 



Introduction to Counseling 718 
Elective Core 



46 



Third Year 

5th Semester Credit 

Principles and Dynamics of Group 
Counseling 720 3 

Manpower Internship 725 3 

Elective Core 3 

9 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

Wyatt D. Kirk, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology and Guidance. B.S., 
M.S., Ed.D., Western Michigan University; Associate Professor 

Harold L. Lanier, Instructor of Educational Psychology and Guidance. B.S., M.S., 
North Carolina A. & T. State University; Instructor 

Aurelia C. Mazyck, Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Guidance. B. S. , 
Howard University; M.S., N.Y. University; Ph.D., The University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro; Assistant Professor 

Myrtle B. Sampson, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology and Guidance. 
B.S., M.L.S., North Carolina Central University; M. A., University of Michigan at 
Ann Arbor; M.Ed., Ed.D, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Ph.D., 
Heed University; Associate Professor 

Jane H. Walter, Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Guidance. B.A. 
Wake Forest University; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Post 
Master's Counseling, University of Delaware; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Insti- 
tute and State University; Assistant Professor 

COURSES 

320-435 Educational Psychology 

320-600 Introduction to Guidance 

320-623 Personality Development 

320-662 Mental Deficiency 

320-706 Organization and Administration of Guidance Services 

320-707 Research Seminar 

320-714 Internship in Guidance 

320-715 Measurement for Guidance 

320-716 Techniques of Individual Analysis 

320-717 Educational and Occupational Information 

320-718 Introduction to Counseling 

320-719 Case Studies in Counseling 

320-720 Principles and Dynamics of Group Counseling 

320-721 Independent Studies 

320-722 Career Education and Vocational Development Theories 

320-723 Student Personnel Services in Post-Secondary Education 

320-724 Advanced Counseling Theories, Strategies and Techniques 

320-725 Human Resource Internship 

320-726 Educational Psychology 

320-727 Child Growth and Development 

320-728 Measurement and Evaluation 

320-729 Mental Hygiene for Teachers 

320-730 Counseling Practicum 



47 



ENGINEERING 

William J. Craft, Assistant Dean, School of Engineering 

W.A. Streat, Chairperson, Architectural Engineering 

Winser Alexander, Chairperson, Electrical Engineering 

Henry Kroeze, Acting Chairperson, Industrial Engineering 

David Klett, Chairperson, Mechanical Engineering 

Office: 112 Graham Hall 

The Master of Science in Engineering Degree Program 

The School of Engineering offers a program of study leading to the Masters of Science 
in Engineering. Students may obtain the M.S.E. degree either with or without a thesis. 
For those students who elect the thesis option, faculty expertise and research is gener- 
ally concentrated in structures and architecture, thermal science, energy conversion 
and mechanics. While reseach areas in Electrical and Industrial Engineering are also 
available to thesis option students, those persons would normally elect the appropriate 
departmental graduate program i.e., the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering 
Program on the Master of Science in Industrial Engineering Program. Students who 
elect the non-thesis option may gear their course work toward general or specialized 
studies in engineering. Many courses are offered during the evening, providing prac- 
ticing engineers and students who work the opportunity to complete a degree program 
at the Masters level. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Master of Science in Engineering 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Regular Admission to the Master of Science in Engineering Program is granted to 
graduates of ABET (formerly ECPD) accredited engineering programs who have at- 
tained a minimum of 2.6/4.0 Grade Point average on their overall undergraduate pro- 
gram of study. Two other categories of admission may also be invoked on a case-by-case 
basis. Persons may be admitted provisionally to the M.S.E. program if any of the 
following conditions apply: 
(i) The undergraduate degree is not from an ABET accredited program in engi- 
neering 
(ii) The undergraduate degree is not in engineering but is in a closely related curric- 
ulum with a substantial enginering science content 
(iii) Any deficiences revealed in the undergraduate transcript may be removed by 
the inclusion of no more than 12 semester credit hours of appropriate undergrad- 
uate course content not for graduate credit 
(iv) The grade point average is below that required for regular admission but there is 
evidence of successful completion of the M.S.E. degree. 
Any provisionally admitted student must earn a minimum of a 3.0 grade point average 
on his graduate work through the semester that his nineth semester graduate course 
credit occurs. In addition, a "B" grade point average must be earned on all non-credit 
undergraduate courses if any were required as a condition of admission. In addition to 
these provisions, other conditions may be imposed on a case-by-case basis as approved 
by the Graduate School. 

Students who hold an undergraduate degree but suffer from course deficiences ex- 
ceeding 12 semester credits can be considered for special student status — undergradu- 
ate. Persons with massive undergraduate engineering and related deficiencies even 
though they hold an undergraduate degree are asked to apply as transfer students to the 
appropriate undergraduate engineering curriculum. 

Other general program requirements include admission to candidacy and the satis- 
factory completion of a final comprehensive examination. The format description of this 



examination is provided in detail under departmental requirements. Thesis option 
students are expected to follow reasonable guidelines in their field of study as approved 
by the Graduate School Dean. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Upon admission to graduate study, the Dean of the graduate school assigns an initial 
academic advisor. With the help of the initial advisor, the student selects a permanent 
academic advisor. The course of study must have the approval of the academic advisor. 
It is designed to be consistent with the student's engineering interests at the advanced 
level and his interest in either a thesis or non-thesis option. The permanent advisor 
should become the thesis advisor in the case of the thesis option student. The thesis 
advisor should select at least two persons competent to serve on the thesis committee to 
evaluate thesis progress and to participate in the oral thesis defense and comprehensive 
examination. 

The minimum credit requirements for a Master of Science in Engineering degree are 
thirty (30) semester credits for students who elect to take the thesis option. This in- 
cludes six (6) credits of thesis. The minimum requirement is thirty-three (33) semester 
credits for non-thesis option students. In either option, at least twenty (20) credits are 
required from within engineering. At least one half of all courses must be at the 700 
level unless explicitly excluded by the Graduate School Dean. M.S.E. candidates who 
elect the non-thesis option must pass a written final comprehensive examination. The 
advisor coordinates the examination for the student and three to five examiners of 
which the advisor may be one. Typically the examination lasts at least six (6) hours over 
a one week period. The student must satisfy the majority of examiners to pass. 

M.S.E. candidates who elect the thesis option face an oral examination scheduled by 
the thesis advisor after the thesis research has been approved for final typing by the 
thesis committee. In the examination, the student must satisfy his committee on ques- 
tions relating to his thesis or coursework. An affirmative vote by the majority of the 
committee after the oral examination is sufficient for a passing recommendation. His 
graduate committee is normally composed of from 3 to 5 persons including the advisor. 
Up to 2 members can be external to the University. 

ACCREDITATION 

The Master of Science in Engineering degree program is supported by the adminis- 
tration and faculty of the four departments where undergraduate engineering degree 
programs are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 
Inc. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

The holder of the Master of Science in Engineering degree is typically employed in 
an engineering or management position within government and industry. The M.S.E. 
degree, in particular the thesis option, is a good background for persons wishing to 
enroll in a Ph. D. program in engineering. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM GUIDE 

The curriculum is determined by the student and his/her advisor according to inter- 
est. Typical areas of concentration are given below. They do not include possible 
Electrical Engineering and Industrial Engineering topics listed elsewhere. 

Fluids and Thermal Sciences 

400-603 Statistical Thermodynamics 3(3-0) 

400-609 Advanced Fluid Dynamics 3(3-0) 

400-710 Boundary Layer Theory 3(3-0) 

400-735 Heat Transfer I — Conduction 3(3-0) 



49 



400-736 Heat Transfer II — Radiation 3(3-0 

400-737 Heat Transfer III — Convection 3(3-0 

400-738 Irreversible Thermodynamics 3(3-0 

400-746 Phase Equilibria 3(3-0 

400-762 Advanced Thermodynamics and Mass Transport 3(3-0 

Manufacturing 

400-675 Theories of Machining Processes 3(3-0 

400-681 Numerical Control in Manufacturing 3(3-0 

400-708 Deformation Analysis in Metal Processing 3(3-0 

400-740 Machine Tools and Tool Design 3(3-0 

400-757 Physical Metallurgy of Industrial Alloys 3(3-0 

Solid Mechanics 

400-602 Advanced Strength of Materials 3(3-0 

400-614 Mechanics of Engineering Modeling 3(3-0 

400-624 Mechanical Vibrations 3(3-1 

400-642 Design by Finite Element Methods 3(3-0 

400-656 Modern Composite Materials 3(3-0 

400-667 Intermediate Dynamics 3(3-0 

400-672 Theory of Elasticity 3(3-0 

400-679 Mathematical Theory of Plasitcity 3(3-0 

400-685 Mechanical Properties and Structure of Solids 3(3-0 

400-688 Experimental Stress Analysis 3(3-0 

400-715 Continuum Mechanics 3(3-0 

400-728 Advanced Dynamics 3(3-0 

400-742 Mechanical Properties and Theories of Failure 3(3-0 

400-743 Energy Methods in Applied Mechanics 3(3-0 

400-748 Advanced Theory of Elasticity 3(3-0 

400-750 Theory of Elastic Stability 3(3-0 

400-778 Theory of Vibrations 3(3-0 

Structures 

400-628 Foundation Engineering 3(2-2 

400-635 Structural Steel Design 3(3-0 

400-644 Matrix Analysis of Structures 3(2-2 

400-652 Theory of Plates and Shells 3(3-0 

400-700 Advanced Reenforced Concrete Design 3(2-2 

400-701 Advanced Structural Analysis 3(3-0 

400-719 Design of Buildings for Extreme Wind and Earthquake Forces 3(3-0 

400-755 Plastic Analysis and Design 3(3-0 

400-759 Prestressed Concrete Theory and Design 3(3-0 

400-767 Structural Dynamics 3(3-0 

400-779 Advanced Structural Steel Design 3(2-2 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

Elias Abu-Saba, Associate Professor of Architectural Engineering PhD. , Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute and State University; PE. 

Ronnie Bailey, Assistant Professor of Architectural Engineering M.S., University of 
Wisconsin. 

Water Blue, Assistant Professor of Architectural Engineering B.Arch., North Carolina 
State University; AIA. 

Wesley C. Clark Associate Professor of Architectural Engineering PhD. Oklahoma 
State University. 

Hermon Fox, Assistant Professor of Architectural Engineering M.S., Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute and State University; PE. 

50 



William A. Street Jr., Professor of Architectural Engineering S.M., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; AIA. 

John A. Stulinsky, Professor of Architectural Engineering D.T.S., Warsaw Polytechnic 
University; AIA. 

Reginald Whitsett, Assistant Professor of Architectural Engineering M.Arch., North 
Carolina State University. 

Ali Abul-Fadl, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering PhD., University of 
Idaho. 

Winser E. Alexander, Professor and Chairman of Electrical Engineering PhD., Uni- 
versity of New Mexico. 

M. Hashem Anwari, Adjunct Instructor of Electrical Engineering M.S.E. North Caro- 
lia Agricultural and Technical State University. 

Ward J. Collis, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

Harold Martin, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Ph. D. , Virginia Polytech- 
nic Institute and State University. 

David E. Olson, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering PhD., University of 
Utah. 

Earnest E. Sherrod, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering M.S., Newark Col- 
lege of Engineering. 

Stewart Stanton, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering Ph.D., Iowa State Uni- 
versity. 

Elias K. Stefanakos, Professor of Electrical Engineering Ph.D., Washington State 
University. 

Ta-Hsien Wei, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Ph. D. , Columbia Univer- 
sity. 

Leo Williams Jr., Professor of Electrical Engineering M.S. , University of Illinois; PE. 

Chung Yu, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering Ph.D., Ohio State Univer- 
sity. 

Ekamaram Shanthi-Iyer, Research Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Ph. D. , Indian Institute of Technology. 

Mustafa Pulat, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Pakize Simin Pulat, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering Ph.D. candidate, 
North Carolina State University. 

Mehmet T. Altiok, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering M.S., North Carolina 
State University. 

Henry Kroeze, Adjunct Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering IR, Delft Tech- 
nological University- 
Albert W. Wortham, Professor of Industrial Engineering Ph.D., Oklahoma State Uni- 
versity. 

B.M. Botros, Professor of Mechanical Engineering Ph.D., University of Sheffield; PE. 

Suresh Chandra, Professor and Dean — School of Engineering Ph. D. , Colorado State 
University. 

R.S. Chauhan, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Ph.D., Auburn Univer- 
sity. 

William J. Craft, Professor and Associate Dean — School of Engineering Ph. D. , Clem- 
son University; PE. 

George J. Filatovs, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Ph.D., University 
of Missouri-Rolla. 

Yogi Goswami, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Ph.D., Auburn Univer- 
sity; PE. 

M.A. Haque, Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of York (England). 

David E. Klett, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Ph.D., University of 
Florida; PE. 

51 



Chih Hwa Li, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering M.S., University of 
Michigan. 

TonyC. Min, Professor of Mechanical Engineering Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

W.C. Musselwhite, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering M.S., North Caro- 
lina Agricultural and Technical State University. 

K.G. Punwani, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Ph.D. candi- 
date, Syracuse University. 

Nathan H. Sanders, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering M.S., North Caro- 
lina Agricultural and Technical State University. 

A. Vishnu Sharma, Professor of Mechanical Engineering Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University. 

Lonnie Sharpe Jr. , Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Ph. D. , University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Number and Course 

400-602 Advanced Strength of Materials 

400-603 Statistical Thermodynamics 

400-609 Advanced Fluid Dynamics 

400-614 Mechanics of Engineering Modeling 

400-624 Mechanical Vibrations 

400-628 Foundation Engineering 

400-635 Structural Steel Design 

400-642 Design by Finite Element Methods 

400-644 Matrix Analysis of Structures 

400-648 Numerical Analysis for Engineers 

400-652 Theory of Plates and Shells 

400-656 Modern Composite Materials 

400-660 Selected Topics in Engineering 

400-666 Special Projects 

400-667 Intermediate Dynamics 

400-672 Theory of Elasticity 

400-675 Theories of Machining Processes 

400-679 Mathematical Theory of Plasticity 

400-681 Numerical Control in Manufacturing 

400-685 Mechanical Properties and Structure of Solids 

400-688 Experimental Stress Analysis 

400-700 Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design 

400-701 Advanced Structural Analysis 

400-703 Research Techniques in Material Science 

400-708 Deformation Analysis in Metal Processing 

400-710 Boundary Layer Theory 

400-715 Continuum Mechanics 

400-719 Design of Buildings for Extreme Wind and Earthquake Forces 

400-728 Advanced Dynamics 

400-735 Heat Transfer I — Conduction 

400-736 Heat Transfer II — Radiation 

400-737 Heat Transfer III — Convection 

400-738 Irreversible Thermodynamics 

400-740 Machine Tools and Tool Design 

400-742 Mechanical Properties and Theories of Failure 

400-743 Energy Methods in Applied Mechanics 

400-746 Phase Equilibria 

400-748 Advanced Theory of Elasticity 

400-750 Theory of Elastic Stability 

400-755 Plastic Analysis and Design 



52 



400-757 Physical Metallurgy of Industrial Alloys 

400-759 Prestressed Concrete Theory and Design 

400-762 Advanced Thermodynamics and Mass Transport 

400-767 Structural Dynamics 

400-777 Thesis 

400-778 Theory of Vibrations 

400-779 Advanced Structural Steel Design 

400-780 Mechanical Metallurgy 

400-788 Research 

400-789 Special Topics 

Electrical Engineering 

Wlnser Alexander, Chairperson 
Office: 114 Graham Hall 

The objective of the Electrical Engineering Department is to emphasize advance 
studies in solid state electronics, computer engineering, systems science and power 
systems. The program is designed to provide graduate level education for advanced 
professional practice or for further graduate study. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Master of Science in Electrical Engineering 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the graduate degree program in the Department of 
Electrical Engineering is based upon a Baccalaureate degree in Electrical Engineering 
from an accredited undergraduate institution. A grade point average of 3.0 out of 4.0 is 
required for unconditional admission to the M.S.E.E. program. Provisional admission 
may be granted to a candidate who possesses an accredited undergraduate degree in 
engineering or in a closely related discipline and has no background deficiencies re- 
quiring more than twelve semester hours at the undergraduate level. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Two options are offered in the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering program. 
A minimum of 30 semester hours, including 6 hours of thesis are required for the 'thesis 
option' and a minimum of 33 semester hours, including 3 hours of special projects are 
required for the 'project option'. 

In order to graduate, students are required to maintain a grade point average of 3. in 
all graduate (600 and 700) level course work. A minimum of 50% of these courses must 
be at the 700 level. 



DIRECTORY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE FACULTY 

Electrical Engineering Graduate Faculty 

Ali Abul-Fadl, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Idaho 

Winser E. Alexander, Professor of Electrical Engineering B.S., N.C. A&T State Uni- 
versity; M.S., Ph.D., University of New Mexico. 

Ward J. Collis, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering B.S., M.S., Northwest- 
ern University, Ph.D., Ohio State University. 



53 



David E. Olson, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering B.S., Michigan Techni- 
cal University; Ph.D., University of Utah 

Harold Martin, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering B.S., M.S., North Caro- 
lina A&T State University, Ph. D. , Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University 

Ernest E. Sherrod, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering B.S., NC A&T State 
University; M.S. Newark College of Engr. 

Elias K. Stefanakos, Professor of Electrical Engineering B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Washing- 
ton State University 

Ta-Hsien Wei, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering B.S., National Taiwan 
University; M.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Leo Williams, Jr., Professor of Electrical Engineering B.S., M.S., University of Illi- 
nois 

Chung Yu, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering B. Eng. McGill University; 
M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LISTING 

NUMBER COURSE 

420-606 Automatic Control Theory 

420-608 Solid State Energy Conversion 

420-610 Introduction to Quantum Electronics 

420-612 Modulation Theory & Communication Systems 

420-620 Computer Software Design 

420-622 Analog Electronics 

420-627 Switching Theory 

420-630 Digital Signal Processing I 

420-632 Information Theory 

420-633 Digital Electronics 

420-636 Computer methods in Power Systems 

420-637 Power Systems Analysis 

420-646 Network Synthesis 

420-654 Projects in Electronic Network & Systems 

420-660 Selected Topics in Engineering 

420-666 Special Projects 

420-670 Semiconductor Theory and Devices 

420-675 Integrated Circuit Fabrication Methods 

420-676 Microprocessors: Theory & Practice 

420-677 VLSI Design 

420-680 Solid State Technology Lab Techniques I 

420-683 Probability and Random Processes 

420-707 Physical Tensor Properties of Crystals 

420-722 Electromagnetic Wave Theory 

420-727 Switching & Finite Automata Theory 

420-724 Theory of Linear Systems 

420-744 Network Matrices & Graphs 

420-752 Solid State Technology Lab Techniques II 

420-761 Statistical Communication Theory 

420-763 Computed Aided Network Design 

420-765 Digital Signal Processing II 

420-772 Theory and Design of Digital Systems 

420-777 Thesis 

420-788 Research 

420-789 Special Topics 



54 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION AND READING 

Marian L. Vick, Chairperson 
Office: Hodgin 

At the graduate level, the department offers curricular leading to the Master of 
Science degree in Early Childhood Education, Intermediate Education, Elementary 
Education (General) and Reading. The program aims to develop prospective teachers 
who will realize the importance of change, and the need for continued learning. All 
persons who guide the development of young children need an understanding of the 
child, his world, and the numerous forces that influence him, as well as the basic 
principles on which decisions regarding instruction and practice are based. 

The graduate program in reading prepares teachers of reading for reading education 
at all levels as well as State Certification in reading. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Early Childhood Education — M.S. 
Elementary Education (General) — M.S. 
Intermediate Education — M.S. 
Reading Education — M.S. 
Reading Education — State Certification 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Students must follow the general admission requirements for graduate studies. They 
must meet professional education requirements for a Class A graduate-level teaching 
certificate, and must also meet the requirements for admission to candidacy for a 
degree as stated in "Admission and Other Information." 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

The major in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education and Reading must 
complete 30 semester hours of graduate-level courses for a graduate degree and at least 
18 semester hours for certification in reading. 

An overall grade point average of 3.0 must be maintained for the degree programs and 
for certification in reading. 

A comprehensive examination is required for each of the degree programs as well as 
for certification in reading. 

ACCREDITATION 

All Teacher Education Programs are accredited by the National Council for Accredi- 
tation of Teacher Education and approved by the North Carolina State Department of 
Public Instruction. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

In addition to preparing teachers for K-3, intermediate, elementary and reading (K- 
12), a degree in these fields also provides for career opportunities in allied fields such as 
health, social service, child/family relations, communication arts and other diversified 
areas. 



55 



Reading Education Curriculum: 30 S.H. Required 

The Reading Education Curriculum has two distinct approaches to certification, 
namely Option I and Option II. Option I is for those students who wish to complete 
Class A or graduate level certification, while Option II is for those students desiring to 
complete a degree program in Reading. 

A. Option I: Requires 18 semester hours from the following. 
Reading — 15 semester hours 

310-630 Foundations in Reading 3s.h. 

310-631 Word Recognition/Identification Skills 3s.h. 

310-635 Reading Through the Primary Years 3s.h. 

310-636 Reading in the Elementary Grades 3s.h. 

310-637 Reading in the Secondary School 3s.h. 

310-638 Classroom Diagnosis in Reading 3s.h. 

310-639 Reading Practicum 3s.h. 

310-640 Reading for the Atypical Learner 3 s.h. 

310-739 Reading in the Content Areas 3 s.h. 
The following courses shown in the list above are required for State Certification 
in reading, Class A or G: Education 630, 635, or 636 or 637, 638, 739. 
Cognate Areas — 3 semester hours 

350-706 Media in Special Education and Reading 3 s.h. 

212-626 Children's Literature 3 s.h. 

212-710 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers 3 s.h. 

212-754 History and Structure of the English Language 3 s.h. 
Other Requirements 

Overall grade point average of 3.0 for all graduate courses 

Comprehensive Examination 

B. Option II: A total of 30 semester hours is required. This program leads to the 
Master of Science in Reading. 

Reading — 18 semester hours 

310-630 Foundations in Reading 3 s.h. 

310-631 Word Recognition/Identification Skills 3 s.h. 

310-635 Reading Through the Primary Years 3 s.h. 

310-636 Reading in the Elementary Grades 3 s.h. 

310- 638 Diagnosis in Reading 3 s.h. 

310-639 Reading Practicum 3 s.h. 

310-640 Reading for the Atypical Learner 3 s.h. 

310-739 Reading in the Content Areas 3 s.h. 

310-741 Advanced Diagnosis 3 s.h. 

310-742 Organization and Administraton of Reading Programs 3 s.h. 

310-743 Advanced Practicum 3 s.h. 

310-744 Seminar and Research in Reading 3 s.h. 
Foundations of Education Courses — 6 semester hours required 

311-701 Philosophy of Education (or) 3 s.h. 

311-703 Educational Sociology 3 s.h. 

311-625 Theory of American Public Education 3 s.h. 

311-720 Curriculum Development (or) 3 s.h. 

311-721 Curriculum in the Elementary School (or) 3 s.h. 

311-722 Curriculum in the Secondary School 3 s.h. 

320-726 Educational Psychology (or) 3 s.h. 

320-727 Child Growth and Development 3 s.h. 

311-711 Educational Statistics 3 s.h. 
Cognate Areas — 6 semester hours required 

350-706 Media in Special Education and Reading 3 s.h. 

212-626 Children's Literature 3 s.h. 

212-710 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers 3 s.h. 



56 



212-754 History and Structure of the English Language 3s.b. 

If a student has already earned 18 semester hours in Reading at the Class A or 
graduate level for state certification purposes then he/she may elect additional hours 
necessary to complete requirements from the following courses with academic advise- 
ment. 

Required Reading Courses for the M.S. Degree in Reading 

310-630 Foundations in Reading (or) 3s.h. 

310-740 Problems in the Improvement of Reading 3s.h. 

310-635 Reading Through the Primary Years (or) 3 s.h. 

310-636 Reading in the Elementary Grades 3 s.h. 

310-636 Classroom Diagnosis in Reading (or) 3 s.h. 

310-741 Advanced Diagnosis in Reading 3 s.h. 

310-739 Reading in the Content Areas 3 s.h. 

310-742 Organization and Administration of Reading Programs 3 s.h. 

310-744 Seminar and Research in Reading 3 s.h. 

Cognate Areas 

350-706 Media in Special Education and Reading 3 s.h. 

212-710 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers 3 s.h. 

212-754 History and Structure of the English Language 3 s.h. 



Elementary Education Curriculum (General): 30 S.H. Required 

A. Non-Thesis Option 
1. Courses Required 

a. 311-790 Seminar in Educational Problems (after completion of 24 graduate 
semester hours) 

b. Three (3) semester hours are to be chosen from each of the following areas, 
making a total of 9 semester hours from those listed below: 

(1) The nature of the learner and the learning process 
320-726 Educational Psychology 

320-727 Child Growth and Development 
311-711 Educational Statistics 

(2) Theoretical, historical, sociological, and philosophic bases for educational 
practices 

311-625 Theory of American Public Education 

311-626 History of American Education 

311-627 The Afro-American Experience in American Education 

311-628 Seminar and Practicum in Urban Education 

311-701 Philosophy of Education 

311-703 Educational Sociology 

311-780 Comparative Education 

311-781 Issues in Elementary Education 

(3) Curriculum Development 
311-720 Curriculum Development 

310-721 Curriculum in the Elementary School 

c. Eighteen hours taken from English, reading, fine arts, health and physical 
education, mathematics, science, special education, and social studies, with 
emphasis on instructional areas most appropriate for general elementary edu- 
cation. 

B. Thesis Option 

1. Courses Required 

The program requirements for the thesis option are the same as those outlined 
above under Non-Thesis Option with the exception that the student pursuing the 
thesis program must take 311-791: Thesis Research instead of 311-790. 

2. Other Requirements 

57 



a. Qualifying Examination 

b. Graduate Record Examination 

c. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

d. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Education 

e. Thesis Examination 



Early Childhood Education Curriculum (Grades K-3): 30 S.H. 

Required 

A. Non-Thesis Option 

1. Courses Required 

a. 311-790 Seminar in Educational Problems (after completion of 24 graduate 
semester hours) 

b. Three (3) semester hours should be chosen from each of the following areas, 
making a total of 9 semester hours from those listed below: 

(1) The nature of the learner and the learning process 
320-726 Educational Psychology 

320-727 Child Growth and Development 
311-711 Educational Statistics 

(2) Theoretical, historical, sociological, and philosophic bases for educational 
practices 

311-625 Theory of American Public Education 

311-626 History of American Education 

311-627 The Afro-American Experience in American Education 

311-628 Seminar and Practicum in Urban Education 

311-701 Philosophy of Education 

311-703 Educational Sociology 

311-780 Comparative Education 

310-781 Issues in Elementary Education 

(3) Curriculum Development 

310-683 Curriculum in Early Childhood Education 

311-720 Curriculum Development 

310-721 Curriculum in the Elementary School 

c. Twelve hours taken from English, reading, fine arts, health and physical edu- 
cation, mathematics, science, social studies, and special education, with em- 
phasis on instructional areas most appropriate for early childhood education. 

d. Six hours of electives 

2. Other Requirements 

a. Qualifying Examination 

b. Graduate Record Examination 

c. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

d. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Education 

B. Thesis Option 

1. Courses Required 

Program requirements for the thesis option are the same as those listed above 
under Non-Thesis Option with the exception that the thesis program must include 
311-791: Thesis Research instead of 311-790. 

2. Other Requirements 

a. Qualifying Examination 

b. Graduate Record Examination 

c. 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

d. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Education 

e. Thesis Examination 



58 



Intermediate Education Curriculum (Grades 4-9) 30 S.H. Required 

A. Non-Thesis Option 

1. Courses Required 

a. 311-790 Seminar in Educational Problems (after completion of 24 graduate 
semester hours) 

b. Three (3) semester hours are to be chosen from each of the following areas, 
making a total of 9 semester hours from those listed below. 

(1) The nature of the learner and the learning process 
320-726 Educational Psychology 

320-727 Child Growth and Development 
311-711 Educational Statistics 

(2) Theoretical, historical, sociological, and philosophic bases for education 
practices 

311-625 Theory of American Public Education 

311-626 History of American Education 

311-627 The Afro-American Experience in American Education 

311-628 Seminar and Practicum in Urban Education 

311-701 Philosophy of Education 

311-703 Educational Sociology 

311-780 Comparative Education 

310-781 Issues in Elementary Education 

(3) Curriculum Development 
311-720 Curriculum Development 

311-721 Curriculum in the Elementary School 

c. Eighteen hours should be chosen from the areas of English, reading, fine arts, 
health and physical education, mathematics, science, social studies, and spe- 
cial education, with emphasis on courses which apply most directly to the 
elementary school. It is suggested that the student select a concentration in not 
more than two of the instructional areas of the elementary school curriculum. 

2. Other Requirements 

a. Qualifying Examination 

b. Graduate Record Examination 

c. Maintain a 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

d. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Education 

B. Thesis Option 

1. Courses Required 

The Student pursuing the thesis program should meet the same course require- 
ments as those listed above under the Non-Thesis Option except that s/he should 
take 311-791: Thesis Research instead of 311-790: Seminar in Educational Prob- 
lems. 

2. Other Requirements 

a. Qualifying Examination 

b. Graduate Record Examination 

c. Maintain a 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

d. Master's Comprehensive Examination in Education 

e. Thesis Examination 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

Elementary Education and Reading 

Marian Lee Vick, B.S., Fayetteville State University; M.S., University of Michigan; 
C.A.G.S., Syracuse University; Ed.D., Duke University; Professor 



59 



Gladys F. Blue, B.M., Willamette University; M.M., Eastman School of Music, Uni- 
versity of Rochester; Ph.D., University of Akron; Associate Professor 

Morris C. Peterkin, B.S., Cheyney State College; M.S., Governors State University; 
M.Ed. Certificate, Temple University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Associate 
Professor 

Pamelal. Hunter, B.S., Livingstone College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina st Greens- 
boro; Ph. D. , Ohio State; Assistant Professor 

Karen J. Sepsi, B.S., California State College, California Pa.; M.Ed., California State 
College; Ed. D. , University of Cincinnati; Assistant Professor 

COURSES 

310-630. Foundations in Reading 

310-631. Word Recognition/Identification Skills 

310-635. Teaching Reading Through the Primary Years 

310-636. Methods and Materials in Teaching Reading in the Elementary School 

310-637. Teching Reading in the Secondary School 

310-638. Classroom Diagnosis in Reading Instruction 

310-639. Reading Practicum 

310-640. Reading for the Atypical Learner 

310-660. Introduction to Exceptional Children 

310-661. Psychology of the Exceptional Child 

310-662. Mental Deficiency 

310-663. Measurement and Evaluation in Special Education 

310-664. Materials, Methods and Problems in Teaching Mentally Retarded Children 

310-665. Practicum in Special Education 

310-683. Curriculum in Early Childhood 

310-684. Methods in Early Childhood 

310-721. Curriculum in the Elementary School 

310-739. Reading in the Content Areas 

310-740. Problems in the Improvement of Reading 

310-741. Advanced Diagnosis in Reading Instruction 

310-742. Organization and Administration of Reading Programs 

310-743. Advanced Practicum in Reading 

310-744. Seminar and Research in Reading 

310-781. Issues in Elementary Education 

310-783. Current Research in Elementary Education 

310-E785. Independent Reading in Education I 

310-E786. Independent Readings in Education II 

310-E787. Independent Readings in Education III 

ENGLISH 

Jimmy L. Williams, Chairperson 
Office: 202 Crosby Hall 

ENGLISH 

The objectives of the English Department are to provide in-depth training in En- 
glish-Education, English and Afro-American literature, folklore and language. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

English and Afro-American Literature — M. A. 
English Education — M.S. 



60 



Requirements for Admission to the M.A. Program in English and Afro-American 
Literature and the M.S. Program in English-Education 

All applicants to the M.A. program must have earned a bachelor's degree from a four- 
year college. Applicants must also have completed a minimum of twenty-four (24) 
undergraduate hours in English. The hours must include at least three semester hours 
of Shakespeare, three of American literature, three of English literature, three of world 
literature of contemporary literature, and three of advanced grammar and compostion. 

A student who fails to meet these qualifications will be expected to satisfy the re- 
quirements by enrollig in undergraduate courses before beginning graduate studies in 
English. 

Application forms may be obtained from the office of the Graduate School or the 
English Department and must be completed and returned to the Graduate Office. Two 
(2) official transcripts of previous undergraduate or graduate records and three (3) 
letters of recommendation must be forwarded to the Graduate Office before action can 
be taken on the application. An applicant may be admitted to the program uncondition- 
ally, provisionally, or as a special student. 

Unconditional Admission . To qualify for unconditional admission to the M.A. pro- 
gram, an applicant must have earned an overall average of 3.00 on a four-point system 
(or 2.00 on a three-point system) in undergraduate studies. 

Provisional Admission . An applicant may be admitted to graduate studies on a provi- 
sional basis if (1) the record of undergraduate preparation reveals deficiencies that can 
be removed near the beginning of graduate study or (2) lacking the required grade point 
average for unconditional admission, the applicant may become eligible by successfully 
completing the first nine (9) hours of course work with a 3.00 or better average. A 
student provisionally admitted may also be required to pass examinations to demon- 
strate his knowledge in certain areas or to take special undergraduate courses to im- 
prove his background. 

Special Students . Students not seeking the M.A. degree may be admitted in order to 
take courses for self-improvement or for renewal of teaching certificates. If the student 
subsequently wishes to pursue the M.A. program, he or she must request an evaluation 
of the work. Under no circumstances may the student apply toward a degree program 
more than twelve (12) hours earned as a special student. 

M.A. and M.S. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Except for the foreign language requirement, the admission requirements are the 
same for the M.S. in Education-English as they are for the M.A. in English and Afro- 
American Literature. 

Total Hours Required. The M.A. program consists of two distinct and parallel ele- 
ments. The student may elect to take twenty-four (24) hours of course work and write a 
thesis for six (6) hours credit in order to satisfy the thirty-hour minimum requirement. 
The student may also elect not to write a thesis and take an additional six (6) hours of 
course work in order to satisfy the thirty-hour minimum requirement. Three courses 
are required: English 754 — History and Structure of the English Language, English 
753 — Literary Research and Bibliography, and English 700 — Literary Analysis and 
Criticism. The student must take a minimum of twelve (12) hours and no more than a 
maximum of fifteen (15) hours in Afro-American Literature. 

Approximately fifty percent of the courses offered each semester will be open only to 
graduate students. These courses are on the 700 level. All 600 level courses will be open 
only to graduate students. These courses are the 700 level. All 600 level courses will be 
open to both undergraduate and graduate students. 

Grades Required. Students in the M.A. program must maintain a 3.00 average in 
order to satisfy the grade requirements of the program. If a student receives a C or 



61 



lower in more than two (2) courses, he or she will be dropped from the program. 

Amount of Credit Accepted for Transfer. The Graduate School will accept six (6) 
semester hours of transfer credit from another instiution for those students enrolled in 
degree programs. 

Other Requirements (Comprehensive and Thesis Examinations) . Students must pass 
a three (3) hour written comprehensive examination administered by the English De- 
partment. The comprehensive examination will cover only material to which the stu- 
dent has been exposed in course work at A. and T. The comprehensive may be taken 
twice. Those students who elect to write a thesis must meet the deadlines projected by 
the Graduate School in addition to standing a one-hour oral examination which consitu- 
tes a defense of the thesis. The defense may be attempted twice. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Both the M.A. and M.S. degrees prepare students to pursue graduate study for the 
doctorate in English and related fields. The M.S. prepares one to teach on the second- 
ary and college levels. The M.A. degree is designed primarily to prepare one for college 
teaching and for admission to doctoral programs. 

Curriculum Guide for M.A. Degree 

Non-Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required 

1. Required: English 700, 753, 754 

2. Twelve (12) hrs. from: English 650, 652, 654, 656, 658, 660, 760, 762, 764, 766 

3. Nine (9) hrs. from: English 603, 620, 628, 662, 702, 704, 720, 749, 750, 751, 752, 
755, 770 

4. Foreign Language: Demonstrated proficiency in French, Spanish, German or an 
approved substitute. 

Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required 

1. Required: English 700, 753, 754 

2. Nine to twelve (9-12) hrs. from: English 650, 652, 654, 658, 660, 760, 762, 764, 766 

3. Nine (9) hrs. from: English 603, 620, 628, 662, 702, 704, 720, 749, 750, 751, 752, 
755, 770 

4. Foreign Language: Demonstrated proficiency in French, Spanish, German or an 
approved substitute. 

5. Thesis Research: English 775, 3 s.h. 

Curriculum Guide for M.S. Degree 

Non-Thesis Option: 30 s .h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. English 700, 753, 754 

2. 15 semester hours selected from the following: English 603, 620, 628, 650, 652, 
654, 656, 658, 660, 662, 702, 704, 749, 750, 751, 752, 755, 760, 762, 764, 766 

Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required . 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. English 700, 753, 754 

2. 12 semester hours selected from the following: 603, 620, 628, 650, 652, 654, 658, 
660, 662, 702, 704, 720, 749, 750, 751, 752, 755, 760, 762, 764, 766, 770 

3. Thesis Research: English 755, 3 s.h. 



62 



DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 



ENGLISH 



Jimmy L. Williams, B.A., Clark College; M.A., Washington University; Ph.D., In- 
diana University; Professor 

Brian Benson, A.B., Guilford College; M. A., University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro; Ph.D., University of South Carolina; Professor 

John Crawford, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.S., University of 
Iowa; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Professor 

Norman Jarrard, A.B., Salem College; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill; Ph.D., University of Texas; Professor 

Irma Cunningham, B. A. , LeMoyne-Owen College; M. A. , Indiana University; Ph. D. , 
The University of Michigan; Associate Professor 

Michael Greene, B.A., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University; Associate 
Professor 

Bobert Levine, B.A., Queens College of the City University of New York; M.A., 
Ph. D. , Cornell University; Associate Professor 

Ethel Taylor, A.B., Spelman College; M.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Indiana Uni- 
versity; Associate Professor 

Sandra Alexander, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.A., Harvard 
University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Assistant Professor 

Ernest Bradford, B.A., Morehouse College; B.D., Morehouse College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Nebraska; Assistant Professor 

John Price, A.B., Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia; Assistant 
Professor 



COURSES 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 



212-603. Introduction to Folklore 

212-620. Elizabethan Drama 

212-621. Grammar and Composition for Teachers 

212-626. Children's Literature 

212-627. Literature for Adolescents 

212-628. The American Novel 

212-650. Afro-American Folklore 

212-652. Afro-American Drama 

212-654. Afro-American Novel I 

212-656. Afro-American Novel II 

212-658. Afro-American Poetry I 

212-660. Afro-American Poetry II 

212-662. History of American Ideas 

COURSES 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. 

212-700. Literary Analysis and Criticism 

212-702. Milton 

212-704. Eighteenth Century English Literature 



63 



212-710. Language Arts for Elementary Teachers I 

212-711. Language Arts for Elementary Teachers II 

212-720. Studies in American Literature 

212-749. Romantic Prose and Poetry of England 

212-750. Victorian Literature 

212-751. Modern British and Continental Fiction 

212-752. Restoration and 18th Century Drama 

212-753. Literary Research and Bibliography 

212-754. History and Structure of the English Language 

212-755. Contemporary Practices in Grammar and Rhetoric 

212-760. Non-Fiction by Afro-American Writers 

212-762. Short Fiction by Afro-American Writers 

212-764. Black Aesthetics 

212-766. Seminar in Afro-American Literature and Language 

212-770. Seminar 

212-775. Thesis Research 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Helen G. LeBlanc, Chairperson 
Office: 302 Crosby Hall 



FRENCH 



Courses Offered for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 



217-602. Problems and Trends in Foreign Languages 

(Formerly French 501, 2571) 
217-603. Oral Course for Teachers of Foreign Languages 

(Formerly French 502) 
217-606. Research in the Teaching of Foreign Languages 

(Formerly French 503, 2573) 
217-607. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century 

(Formerly French 302, 2574) 
217-608. French Literature in the Eighteenth Century 

(Formerly French 303, 2575) 
217-609. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century 

(Formerly French 304, 2576) 
217-610. The French Theatre 

(Formerly French 504, 2577) 
217-612. The French Novel 

(Formerly French 505, 2578) 
217-614. French Syntax 

(Formerly French 506, 2579) 
217-616. Contemporary French Literature 

(Formerly French 305 and 2542, 2580) 

For Graduate Students Only 

217-720. Advanced Reading and Composition 

(Formerly 601, and 2580, 2585) 
217-722. Romantic Movement in France (1820-1848) 

(Formerly 602 and 2581, 2856) 
217-724. Seminar in Foreign Languages 

(Formerly 603 and 2582, 2587) 
217-726. Contemporary Literary Criticism 

(Formerly 604 and 2583, 2588) 
217-728. Independent Study in Foreign Languages 

(Formerly 258, 2589) 
64 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND RECREATION 

Calvin Irvin, Acting Chairperson 
OFFICE: CORBETT GYMNASIUM 

The objective of the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation is to 
provide an opportunity for professionals in the discipline to pursue post baccalaureate 
experiences/degree. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

The Department offers a Master of Science degree in Education with a concentration 
in Health and Physical Education. 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the graduate degree program of Physical Education is 
based upon the general admission requirements of the University. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Non-thesis Option: 30 Semester Hours Required 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. Physical Education 785, 786, and 798 

2. 9 Semester Hours in Physical Education Courses 

3. 6 Semester Hours in Electives 

Thesis Option: 30 Semester Hours 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. Physical Education 785, 786, 798, and 799 

2. 6 Additional Semester Hours in Physical Education courses 

3. 6 Semester Hours in Electives 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

A degree in this field provides content for students preparing for careers or are 
already in the field of Health and Physical Education. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Health Education 

Credit 

330 651 3 

330 652 3 



Physical Education 




330 655 


3 


330 656 


3 


330 657 


3 


330 658 


3 


330 669 


3 


330 679 




For Graduates Only 




330 780 


3 


330 785 


3 


330 786 


3 


330 787 


3 


330 798 


3 



65 



330 


651 


330 


652 


330 


655 


330 


656 


330 


657 


330 


658 


330 


669 


330 


679 


330 


780 



DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

Alston, Dorothy J, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.A., North 
Carolina Central University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; 
Professor 

Dudka, Leonard, B.S., M.A., California State Polytechnic College; Ph.D., University 
of Illinois-Urbana; Professor 

Howell, Hornsby, B.S., M.A., North Carolina A. and T. State University; Instructor 

Irvin, Calvin, B.S., University of Illinois, M.A. Columbia University; Associate Pro- 
fessor 

Moore, Roy D., B.S. North Carolina Central University; M.S., Ph.D., University of 
Illinois; Professor 

Piggott, BertC, B.S., M.S., University of Illinois; Ed.D., University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro; Professor 

Williams, Joseph, B.S., N.C.A. andT. State University; M.S., University of Michigan; 
Assistant Professor 

COURSES 

Personal, School and Community Health Problems 

Methods and Materials in Health Education for Elementary School 
Teachers 

Current Problems and Trends in Physical Education 
Administration of Interscholastic and Intramural Athletics 
Community Recreation 

Current Theories and Practices of Teaching Sports 
Physiology of Exercise 

Prescribed Methods of Rehabilitating the Physically Handicapped 
Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education and Recre- 
ation in Elementary Schools 

330 785 Research in Health, Physical Education and Recreation (Prerequisites: 
Successful completion of 330:785 and 330:786) 

330 786 Scientific Foundations of Physical Education 

330 787 Scientific Foundations of Physical Fitness 

330 798 Seminar 

HISTORY 

Frank C. Bell, Chairperson 
Office: 324 Glbbs Hall 

The Department of History offers a Master of Science degree in Education with a 
concentration in history or the social sciences. The objectives of the History Depart- 
ment are as follows: 1) to provide historical content for students preparing for careers in 
fields such as education, law, religion, journalism, history, and government service; 2) 
to provide a course of study leading to the Masters degree in Education with a concen- 
tration in history and/or the social sciences; 3) to provide graduate training for those 
students seeking doctoral degrees with a view towards becoming career historians and 
college/university teachers. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

History, Secondary Education — M.S. 
Social Science, Secondary Education — M.S. 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree 



66 



program in Education, a student wishing to be accepted as a candidate for the degree of 
Master of Science in Education with a concentration in History or Social Science must 
hold or be qualified to hold a Class A teaching certificate in History or Social Science. 
All graduate students must complete a graduate course in methods of teaching the 
social sciences. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Degrees in these fields provide historical, geographical, and philosophical content 
for students preparing for careers in such fields as education, religion, journalism, 
history, and government service. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

To complete the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Education with a 
concentration in History or Social Science, the student may elect the thesis option or 
the non-thesis option. 

HISTORY 

Non-Thesis Option 

Thirty semester hours required in courses at the 600 level or above. 

1. 21 semester hours in history (Political Science 645 and Political Science 730 are 
accepted for history credit). 

2. 6 semester hours in education (including Education 725, and Education 701 or 625 
or 703 or 720 or 722 or Psychology 726). 

3. 3 semester hours in electives. 

HISTORY 

Thesis Option 

Thirty semester hours required in courses at the 600 level or above including the 
thesis. 

1. 15 semester hours in history. 

2. 6 semester hours in education (including Education 725, and Education 701 or 625 
or 703 or 720 or 722 or Psychology 726). 

3. 6 semester hours thesis. 

4. 3 semester hours electives. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Non-Thesis Option 

Thirty semester hours required in courses at the 600 level or above. 

1. 21 semester hours in social science courses. 

2. 6 semester hours in education (including Education 725, and Education 701 or 625 
or 703 or 720 or 722 or Psychology 726). 

3. 3 semester hours in electives. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Thesis Option 

Thirty semester hours required in courses at the 600 level or above including the 
thesis. 

1. 15 semester hours in social science courses. 

2. 6 semester hours in education (including Education 725, and Education 701 or 625 
or 703 or 720 or 722 or Psychology 726). 

3. 6 semester hours thesis. 

4. 3 semester hours in electives. 



67 



DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

HISTORY 

Frank C. Bell, A.B., M. A., Ph.D., Indiana University; Professor. 

Frenise A. Logan, A.B., Fisk University; M. A., Ph.D., Case Western Beserve Univer- 
sity; Professor 

Dorothy S. Mason, A.B., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., 
University of Georgia; Ph.D., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 
Professor 

James G. Nutsch, B.S., Kansas State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas; 
Professor 

Peter V. Meyers, B.A., Wesleyan University; A.M., Ph.D., Butgers, The State Uni- 
versity; Associate Professor 

COURSES 

233-600. The British Colonies and the American Revolution 

233-603. The Civil War and Beconstruction 

233-605. Seminar on the Soviet Union 

233-606. United States History, 1900-1932 

233-607. United States History, 1932-Present 

233-615. Seminar in the History of Black America 

233-616. Seminar in African History 

233-617. Beadings in African History 

233-625. Seminar in Historiography and Historical Method 

233-626. Bevolutions in the Modern World 

233-630. Seminar in European History, 1815-1914 

233-631. Studies in Twentieth Century Europe, 1914 to the Present 

233-633. Independent Study in History 

*237-645. American Foreign Policy — 1945 to Present 

GEOGRAPHY 

233-640. Topics in Geography of Anglo-America 

233-641. Topics in World Geography 

233-650. Physical Geography I 

233-651. Physical Geography II 

HISTORY- 

233-701. Becent United States Diplomatic History 
233-712. The Black American in the Twentieth Century 
233-730. Seminar in History 

233-740. History, Social Sciences, and Contemporary World Problems 
233-750. Thesis in History 
**237-730. Constitutional Development Since 1865 
***311-725. Problems and Trends in Teaching the Social Sciences 

*Political Science 645 is accepted for history credit. 
**Political Science 730 is accepted for history credit. 
***Education 725 is required for graduate students. 



68 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

George C. Gail, Chairperson 
Office: Price 105 

OBJECTIVES FOR INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS: 

1. To develop advanced competencies in organizing and utilizing technical educa- 
tion strategies methodologies. 

2. To further develop understandings and applications of technical education objec- 
tives, principles, concepts, practices, and philosophies. 

3. To further develop competencies in organizing, directing, and evaluating techni- 
cal education programs, courses, and teaching-learning activities. 

4. To develop proficiencies in utilizing technological-educational problem solving 
and research techniques. 

5. To further develop depth and/or breadth in technological compentencies. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Industrial Arts Education — M.S. 
Vocational — Industrial Education — M.S. 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

A. Unconditional Admission for "G" Certificates in Industrial Education 

1. Baccalaureate degree from accredited undergraduate institution. 

2. Class A certificate in Industrial Arts or Vocational-Occupational Education. 
*(See exception below for post-secondary and private industry majors in Tech- 
nical Education.) 

3. Satisfactory completion of all Graduate School requirements for admission to 
candidacy for a degree. 

4. Failure to meet any of these criteria may necessitate rejection of the applica- 
tion or the requirement of additional undergraduate work. 

B. Provisional Admission for "G" Certificate 

Applicants who enter the Vocational-Industrial Education and desire "G" certifi- 
cates must hold or be qualified to possess the Class A Certificate in Vocational- 
Industrial Education before being admitted to candidacy. Upon entering the 
Vocational-Industrial Option, students are advised of graduate and undergraduate 
course requirements necessary to qualify for specific North Carolina "A" and "G" 
vocational teaching or director certificates. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION MAJOR. Masters degree candidates must com- 
plete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate level courses, which include a 12 
semester hour concentration of Industrial Education courses leading to "G" certifica- 
tion in Industrial Arts teaching. Other course requirements must include 3 semester 
hours of each: Research Techniques, Curriculum, Student Evaluation, Research Semi- 
nar or Thesis, Education or Psychology, Electives. The grade point average in the 
graduate program must be 3.0 or better. (See certification note below) 

VOCATIONAL-INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION MAJOR. Masters degree candidates 
must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate level courses, which in- 
clude a 12 semester hour concentration of Industrial Education courses leading to "G" 
certification for either Trade and Industrial teachers or Local Directors of Vocational 
Education. Other course requirements must include 3 semester hours of each: Re- 
search Techniques, Curriculum, Student or Program Evaluation, Research Seminar or 
Thesis, Education or Psychology, Electives. The grade point average in the graduate 
program must be 3.0 or better. (See certification note below) 



69 



*Persons with technical preparation and interest in post-secondary education or 
technical training programs in private industry, which do not require teacher certifica- 
tion by the State of North Carolina, may pursue a masters degree in Vocational- 
Industrial Education Option but will not be qualified to receive either "A" or "G" 
teaching certificates. 

NOTE:Candidates pursuing Masters degrees in either Industrial Arts or Vocational- 
Industrial Education may also qualify for North Carolina certification in Indus- 
trial Cooperative Training or Middle Grades Occupational Exploration. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES: 

Excellent employment opportunities exist for persons holding advanced degrees in 
all areas of Industrial Education. Public schools in North Carolina and elsewhere are in 
constant need of securing certified teachers, supervisors, and administrators for indus- 
trial programs. 

Many career opportunities also exist for Industrial Education specialists in occupa- 
tions which do not require state teacher certification. These persons are employed as 
teachers, training directors, supervisors, and managers in postsecondary schools and 
colleges or in the private sector of industry. 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

Thesis and Non-Thesis Programs 

REQUIRED COURSES 
(Industrial Arts and Vocational-Industrial Education) 

Semester Hours 

Curriculum 3 

Industrial Education 662 Education 720 

Industrial Education 766 Education 722 

Evaluation 3 

Industrial Education 765 Industrial Education 762 

Education or Psychology 3 

Education 625 Psychology 661 

Education 660 Psychology 726 

Education 701 Psychology 727 

Research Techniques 3 

Industrial Education 767 Education 710 

Research Seminar or Thesis 3 

Non-Thesis 

Industrial Education 768 Education 790 

Thesis 

Industrial Education 769 Education 791 

15 

Elective 3 

MAJOR CONCENTRATIONS 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 12 

Industrial Education 616 Industrial Education 718 

Industrial Education 617 Industrial Education 719 

Industrial Education 618 Industrial Education 731 

Industrial Education 619 Industrial Education 762 



70 



Industrial Education 620 Industrial Technology 651 

Industrial Education 635 Industrial Technology 673 

Industrial Education 664 Industrial Technology 674 

Industrial Education 665 Industrial Technology 735 

Industrial Education 715 Guidance 717 
Industrial Education 718 

MAJOR CONCENTRATIONS Continued 

VOCATIONAL-INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 12 

OPTION I: Trade and Industrial Education 

Industrial Education 660 Industrial Education 717 

Industrial Education 661 Industrial Education 718 

Industrial Education 663 Industrial Education 762 

Industrial Education 664 Industrial Education 763 

Industrial Education 665 Guidance 717 

Educational Media ... (3 Semester Hours Maximum) 

Education 602 Education 605 

Education 603 Education 700 

OPTION II. VOCATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTOR 

Industrial Education 663 Education 761 

Industrial Education 717 Education 763 

Industrial Education 718 Education 792 

Industrial Education 764 Economics 602 

Education 605 Economics 603 

Education 755 Economics 604 

♦OPTION III: Technical Education 

Industrial Education 663 Industrial Education 764 

Industrial Education 717 Education 690 

Industrial Education 718 Education 766 

Industrial Education 762 Education 777 

Industrial Education 763 Education 779 

Educational Media ... (3 Semester Hours Maximum) 

Education 602 Education 605 

Education 603 Education 700 

*NOTE: Graduates in the Vocational-Industrial Technical Education Option are not 
recommended for, or receive either Class "A" or "G" state teaching certifi- 
cates. 

•All courses to meet both degree and certification requirements must be selected with 

approval of Graduate Program Advisor. 



DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 

Department of Industrial Education 

Charles W. Pinckney, B.S., South Carolina State College; M.S., University of Illinois; 
D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; Professor and Director, Division of Indus- 
trial Education and Technology 

George C. Gail, B. S. , A&T College; M.S., University of Minnesota; Associate Profes- 
sor and Department Head 

James F. Davvkins, B.S., A&T College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania; Associate 
Professor 

James L. Jenkins, B. S. , Hampton Institute; M.S., North Carolina A&T State College; 
Assistant Professor 



71 



Department of Industrial Technology 

Arlington W. Chisman, B.S., Virginia State College; M.Ed., Virginia State College; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University; Professor 

Robert B. Pyle, B.A., Trenton State College; M.A., Trenton State College; Certificate, 
Newark State College; Ph. D. , University of Pittsburgh; Professor 

Edgar I. Farmer, B.S., Norfolk State College; M. A., Hampton Institute; D.Ed., Penn- 
sylvania State University; Associate Professor 

Thomas H. Avery, Certificate, Southeastern Signal Institute; B. S. , Hampton Institute; 
M.S., A&T College; Assistant Professor 

Marquis L. Cousins, B.S., A&T College; M.S., A&T College; Assistant Professor 

COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Students 

361-616 Plastic Technology 3(2-2 

361-617 General Crafts 3(2-2 

361-618 Vocational Education for Special Needs Students 3(3-0 

361-619 Industrial Arts Construction 3(2-2 

361-620 Industrial Arts Manufacturing 3(2-2 

361-630 Photography and Educational Media 3(2-2 

361-635 Graphic Arts 3(2-2 

361-660 Industrial Cooperative Programs 3(3-0 

361-661 Organization of Related Study Materials 3(3-0 

361-662 Industrial Course Construction 3(3-0 

361-663 History and Philosophy of Industrial Education 3(3-0 

361-664 Occupational Exploration for Middle Grades 3(3-0 
361-665 Middle Grades Occupational Exploration — Industrial Occupations 3(3-0 

361-668 Independent Studies in Industrial Education 3(3-0 

Graduate Courses in Industrial Education 

361-715 Comprehensive General Shop 3(2-2 

361-717 Industrial Education Problems I 3(3-0 

361-718 Industrial Education Problems II 3(3-0 

361-719 Advanced Furniture Design and Construction 3(2-2 

361-731 Advanced Drafting Techniques 3(2-2 

361-762 Evaluation of Vocational Education Programs 3(3-0 

361-763 General Industrial Education Programs 3(3-0 

361-764 Supervision and Administration of Industrial Education 3(3-0 

361-765 Evaluation in Industrial Subjects 3(3-0 

361-766 Curriculum Laboratory in Industrial Education 3(3-0 

361-767 Research and Literature in Industrial Education 3(3-0 

361-768 Industrial Education Seminar 3(3-0 

361-769 Thesis Research in Industrial Education 3 Hrs. 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

A.W. Wortham, Chairperson 
Office: 206 Graham Hall 

The Master of Science Program in Industrial Engineering is designed to meet the 
need for technical and/or managerial specialists in the Industrial Engineering area of 
concentration. At the same time, a general advanced level of Industrial Engineering 
Theory is attained by requiring each student to complete at least one graduate level 
course in three of the five program areas: Production Planning, Scheduling and Con- 



72 



trol, Engineering Economies and Management, Operations Research, Ergonomics, 
Systems Analysis and Design. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Industrial Engineering — M.S. I.E. 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The program is open to students with a bachelor's degree in a scientific discipline 
from an institution of recognized standing. Students desiring to enter the program who 
do not possess a bachelor's degree in a scientific discipline are required to complete 
with at least a B' average a significant number of background courses in mathematics, 
physics and engineering science prior to admission to the graduate program. Students 
entering the program without a bachelor's degree in Industrial Engineering from an 
accredited department are required to remove all deficiencies in general professional 
prerequisites. 

PROGRAM OPTIONS AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

The Master of Science in Industrial Engineering program consists of two distinct 
options — Thesis and Project. With the Thesis Option, 24 semester hours of course 
work is required. The other six hours must consist of thesis work. These hours must be 
at the 600 and 700 level and a minimum of 50% of these credit hours must be at the 700 
level. The Project Option consists of 30 semester hours of course work and 3 semester 
hours of special project work. These courses must be at the 600 and 700 level. A 
minimum of 50% of these courses must be at the 700 level. A student should submit a 
written thesis/project proposal before completion of 21 graduate credit hours. Before 
submitting the proposal, the student should form an advisory committee in consulta- 
tion with the permanent advisor. In order to graduate, students are required to main- 
tain a grade average of 3.0 in all graduate level course work. 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT 

Recommendations on transfer of up to six semester hours of graduate credit may be 
made to the Graduate School if it is not part of any prior undergraduate degree require- 
ment and if in the opinion of the host department chairman, the coverage could ade- 
quately replace current graduate offerings in the student's curriculum. A minimum of 
three-fourths of the hours required for the degree must be earned in residence study at 
the university. No written comprehensive examination is required, instead an oral 
thesis or project defense is required. 

TYPICAL PLANS OF STUDY 

Production Planning, Scheduling and Controling Concentration 

430-650 Operations Research 

430-640 Intermediate Engineering Economy 

430-658 Project Management and Scheduling 

430-615 Industrial Simulation 

430-678 Engineering Management 

430-718 Advanced Quality Control 

430-716 Applied Regression Analysis 

430-749 Inventory Systems Analysis and Design 

430-777 Thesis or 430-788 Project and 

430-664 Safety Engineering 

430-733 Operations Research II 



73 



Engineering Economics and Management 

430-640 Intermediate Engineering Economy 

430-678 Engineering Management 

430-649 A Survey of Operations Research Methodologies 

430-664 Safety Engineering 

430-730 Industrial Dynamics 

430-658 Project Management and Scheduling 

430-716 Applied Regression Analysis 

430-777 Thesis or 430-788 Project and 

430-626 Systems Analysis and Design 

430-749 Inventory Systems Analysis and Design 

Operations Research and Statistics 

430-650 Operations Research 

430-749 Inventory Systems Analysis and Design 

430-662 Reliability 

430-733 Operations Research II 

430-716 Applied Regression Analysis 

430-718 Advanced Quality Control 

430-658 Project Management and Scheduling 

430-615 Industrial Simulation 

430-777 Thesis or 430-788 Project and 

430-640 Intermediate Engineering Economy 

430-678 Engineering Management 

Ergonomics and Safety 

430-640 Intermediate Engineering Economy 
430-664 Safety Engineering 
430-730 Industrial Dynamics 
430-712 Work Measurement Theory 
430-665 Man/Machine Systems 
430-626 Systems Analysis and Design 
430-658 Project Management and Scheduling 
430-716 Applied Regression Analysis 
430-777 Thesis or 430-788 Project and 

430-718 Advanced Quality Control 

430-649 A Survey of Operations Research Methodologies 

Systems Analysis and Design 

430-662 Reliability 

430-615 Industrial Simulation 

430-712 Work Measurement Theory 

430-658 Project Management and Scheduling 

430-626 Systems Analysis and Design 

430-649 A Survey of Operations Research Methodologies 

430-749 Inventory Systems Analysis and Design 

430-730 Industrial Dynamics 

430-777 Thesis or 430-788 Project and 

430-716 Applied Regression Analysis 

430-665 Man/Machine Systems 



74 



DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Albert W. Wortham, B. A., East Texas University: M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State Uni- 
versity; Professor 

Keytack H. Oh., B.S., Hanyang University; M.S., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University; Associate Professor 

Babur Mustafa Pulat, B.S., M.S., Middle East Technical University; Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University; Assistant Professor 

Henry Kroeze, IR, Delft Technological University; Adjunct Associate Professor 

Pakize Simin Pulat, B.S., Middle East Technical University; M.S., North Carolina 
State University; Assistant Professor 

Mehmet Tayfur Altiok, B.S., M.S., Middle East Technical University; M.S., North 
Carolina State University; Assistant Professor 

COURSES 

430-615 Industrial Simulation 

430-626 Systems Analysis and Design 

430-640 Intermediate Engineering Economy 

430-649 A Survey of Operations Research Methodologies 

430-650 Operations Research 

430-658 Project Management and Scheduling 

430-660 Selected Topics in Engineering 

430-662 Reliability 

430-664 Safety Engineering 

430-665 Man/Machine Systems 

430-666 Special Projects 

430-678 Engineering Management 

430-712 Work Measurement Theory 

430-716 Applied Regression Analysis 

430-718 Advanced Quality Control 

430-730 Industrial Dynamics 

430-733 Operations Research II 

430-749 Inventory Systems Analysis and Design 

430-788 Thesis 

430-789 Special Topics 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Harold E. Mazyck, Chairperson 
Office: BenbowHall 



HOME ECONOMICS 

The objectives of the Home Economics Department are: 

1. To develop satisfying personal, group and family relationships as a basis for active 
participation in a democratic society; 

2. To understand the enrichment of home and family living through the appreciation 
and use of art and advances in science and technology; 

3. To develop an understanding and appreciation of varying cultural backgrounds; 
and 



75 



4. To prepare the individual for gainful employment in one of the major areas of the 
profession. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Food and Nutrition — M.S. 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Admission of students to the graduate program in the Department of Home Eco- 
nomics is a baccalaureate degree from an accredited undergraduate institution and an 
overall grade point average of 2.6 in undergraduate studies. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

The Department of Home Economics offers the Master of Science in Food and Nutri- 
tion. This program requires a minimum of 30 semester hours and has two options, 
Option A and B. All credentials of the students are subject to evaluation of the Graduate 
Faculty of the Department of Home Economics at least four (4) weeks prior to admis- 
sion. 

OPTION A is designed to prepare students for the advanced degree in Food and 
Nutrition and related areas, and careers in food research, nutrition, food testing, food 
demonstrating, clinical nutrition, dietetics, extension service and teaching. For admis- 
sion to this program, applicants should have majored in one or more of the following 
areas: basic food, nutrition (human or animal), biochemistry, mathematics, biology, 
and physiology. Thesis is required. 

The undergraduate program should have included one year of each of the following: 
general chemistry and organic chemistry. Qualified applicants should have at least one 
course in each of the following areas: quantitative analysis, biochemistry, basic nutri- 
tion, diet therapy, and food science (experimental cookery). Failure to meet any of the 
above requirements may necessitate taking of undergraduate courses to meet deficien- 
cies. Admission to candidacy for the M.S. in Food and Nutrition requires the satisfac- 
tory completion of a qualifying examination in Food and Nutrition. This examination is 
in addition to the qualifying essay required by the Graduate School. (To be taken prior 
to the close of the first semester of entrance to the program). Other requirements are 
the Graduate Record Examination, a final comprehensive examination in Food and 
Nutrition which is only taken if a student has maintained a 3.0 grade point average in 
the Graduate courses and work at the 600 level or above, and has completed the 
Departmental Qualifying Examination and Qualifying Essay Examination, a 3.0 grade 
point average overall for all graduate courses, and satisfactory presentation and defense 
of a thesis. 

OPTION B is designed to prepare students for careers in applied nutrition. This pro- 
gram has two options, thesis and non-thesis. Students with a major interest in dietetics, 
public service careers, anthropology, sociology, economics, education and teaching at 
any level from the kindergarten to the college may enter into the program. Option B has 
the flexibility for students to write a thesis or to choose extra course work. Both oppor- 
tunities have meaningful value in relation to students' interests, specialization, and 
career goals. 

All students who have not had any courses in Food and Nutrition must take Home 
Economics 537, Reviewv of Scientific Principles in Food and Nutrition. This course will 
count as a prerequisite to Option B in such cases, and will be in addition to the 30 
semester hours and may not serve as an elective. Both thesis and non-thesis program 
applicants may be requested to take a Diagnostic Test in Food and Nutrition to evaluate 
their strengths and weaknesses. This test must be taken prior to registration. The non- 
thesis program may require more course work. The advisor should be consulted. Non- 
thesis programs must include Home Economics 745, Practicum in Food or Nutrition. 
Admission to candidacy for the M.S. in Food and Nutrition requires the satisfactory 



76 



completion of a qualifying examination in Food and Nutrition. This examination is in 
addition to the qualifying essay required by the Graduate School (To be taken prior to 
the close of the first semester of the student's entrance to the program). Other require- 
ments are the Graduate Record Examination, a final comprehensive examination in 
Food and Nutrition. This examination can be taken only if a student has maintained a 
3.0 grade point average in the Graduate courses and work at the 600 level or above, and 
has completed the Departmental Qualifying Examination and the Qualifying Essay 
Examination. A 3.0 grade point average overall for all graduate courses, and satisfactory 
presentation and defense of thesis (if thesis is presented) is required. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

A degree in this area prepares students to enter careers in research, quality control, 
college and junior college teaching, industry (food science), clinical nutrition, 
dietetics, extension service and public service careers. 

Suggested Curriculum Guide for Option A — Food and Nutrition 

A total of 17 semester hours to be selected from Food and Nutrition courses including: 

Home Economics 730 — (prerequisite Home Economics 630) 5 credits 

Home Economics 735 — (prerequisite Home Economics 236) 4 credits 

Home Economics 736 — (prerequisite Home Economics 635) 4 credits 
*Prerequisite courses will not count in the 30 minimum required hours. 

Electives to equal 10 semester hours to be selected across interdisciplinary areas, in 

consultation and with written approval of the advisor. 
Suggested electives: 

Biochemistry 651 5 credits 

Mathematics 624 3 credits 

Chemistry 642 2 credits 

Zoology 664 or equivalent 3 credits 

Poultry Science 659 3 credits 

Animal Science 615 3 credits 

Animal Science 713 3 credits 

Home Economics 739 — Thesis 3 credits 

Suggested Curriculum Guide for Option B — Thesis 

Required courses 10 semester hours 

Home Economics 736 or equivalent 4 credits 

Home Economics 740 3 credits 

Home Economics 742 3 credits 

*Prerequisite courses will not be counted in the 30 minimum required hours. 

Home Economics 739 — Thesis 3 credits 

Eight (8) semester hours to be selected from the following Food and Nutrition courses: 
Home Economics 734 3 credits 

Home Economics 733 3 credits 

Home Economics 744 2 credits 

Home Economics 738 3 credits 

Home Economics 741 3 credits 

Electives to equal 9 semester hours to be selected to support area of specialization. 

Electives should be 600 and above level courses selected from the following disciplines. 
Computer Science 
Home Economics Education 
Journalism 
Child Development 
Psychology 

Agricultural Education 
Sociology 

77 



Suggested Curriculum Guide for Option B — Non-Thesis 

Required Courses 13 semester hours 

Home Economics 736 4 credits 

Home Economics 740 3 credits 

Home Economics 742 3 credits 

Home Economics 745 3 credits 

Fourteen (14) semester hours to be selected from the following Food and Nutrition 
courses: 

Home Economics 734 

Home Economics 733 

Home Economics 744 

Home Economics 738 

Home Economics 741 

Home Economics 730 without Lab 

Home Economics 735 without Lab 
Electives to equal 9 semester hours to be selected to support the area of specialization. 
Electives should be 600 and above level courses selected from the following disciplines. 

Journalism 

Child Development 

Psychology 

Agricultural Education 

Sociology 
North Carolina A & T State University and University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro share jointly a group of pre-planned professional experiences in clinical dietetics 
approved by the American Dietetics Association in conjunction with the Masters de- 
gree program in Food and Nutrition. The masters degree program for these students 
who have completed Plan IV, or who would qualify for completing Plan IV by taking the 
necessary courses in addition to master level work, could received didactic and clinical 
experiences in dietetics, with emphasis in Management, Clinical and Community 
Dietetics. Students would qualify for membership in the American Dietetic Associa- 
tion and for writing of the registration examination for the Registered Dietetian. Stu- 
dents will complete 1000 hours of clinical experiences totaling a minimum of 24 weeks 
in clinical settings in addition to the regular masters degree program. 

For further information contact the Chairman, Home Economics Department, 
North Carolina A & T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411. 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Harold Mazyck, R.S., South Carolina State College; M.A., New York University; 
Ph.D., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Professor 

RamonaT. Clark, B.A.S.W., M.S.W., California State University; Ph.D. Oklahoma 
State University; Assistant Professor 

JaneT. Davis, B.S., Appalachian State University; M.S., Virgina Polytechnic Institute 
and State University; Instructor 

Seetha Ganapathy, B.S., University of Mysore; Ph.D., University of Bombay; Profes- 
sor 

Sara H. James, B.S., M.S., Virginia State University; Assistant Professor 

Mary D. Litchford, B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee at Knoxville; Lecturer 

Bobby L. Medford, B.A., M.A., Guilford College; Ph.D., The University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro; Assistant Professor 

Eva E. Moore, B.S., West Virginia State College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., 
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Professor 

Rosa Siler Purcell, B.S., North Carolina A & T State University; M.Ed., Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois; Adjunct Assistant Professor 

78 



Chung Woon Seo, B.S., M.S., Korea University; Ph.D., Florida State University; 

Professor 
Anna A. Skimkins, B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University; Assistant Professor 
Myrtle L. Smith, B.S., North Carolina Central University; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State 

University; Professor 
Eula King Vereen, R.D., B.S., Tennessee State University; M.S., The University of 

North Carolina at Greensboro, Assistant Professor 
Katye G. Watson, B.S., North Carolina A &: T State University; Certificate, Nursery 

Training School of Boston; M.Ed., Tufts University; Assistant Professor 

COURSES 

Food and Nutrition 

170-630 Advanced Nutrition 

170-631 Advanced Food Science 

170-632 Food and Nutrition in Early Childhood 

170-635 Introduction to Research Methods in Food and Nutrition 

170-636 Food Promotion 

170-637 Special Problems in Food and Nutrition 

170-645 Special Problems in Food Administration 

170-646 Readings in Food Administration 

170-647 Seminar in Food Administration 

170-730 Nutrition in Health and Disease 

170-733 Nutrition During the Growth and Development 

170-734 Nutrition Education 

170-735 Experimental Foods 

170-736 Research Methods in Food and Nutrition 

170-738 Food Testing and Evaluation 

170-739 Thesis Research 

170-740 Community Nutrition 

170-741 Current Trends in Food Science 

170-742 Cultural and Social Aspects of Food and Nutrition 

170-743 Food Preservation 

170-744 Seminar in Food and Nutrition 

170-745 Practicum in Food or Nutrition 

Home Economics 

170-602 Adult Education in Home Economics 

170-603 Special Problems in Home Economics I 

170-604 Seminar in Home Economics Education 

170-606 Cooperative Extension 

170-607 Cooperative Extension Field Experience 

170-608 Educational Programs in Out-of-School Settings 

170-664 Occupational Exploration in Middle Grades 

170-665 Occupational Exploration in Home Economics in the Middle Grades 

170-706 Special Problems in Home Economics II 

Child Development 

170-715 Special Problems in Child Development 

Clothing, Textiles and Fashion Merchandising 

170-632 Textile Chemistry 

170-624 Advanced Textiles 

170-625 Experimental Clothing and Textiles 

170-626 Tailoring 

79 



MATHEMATICS 

WENDELL P. JONES, Chairperson 

OFFICE: MARTEENA HALL 102 

The Department of Mathematics offers two curricula leading to the Master of Science 
in Education. One is intended primarily for individuals preparing to teach mathematics 
at the junior or senior high school level; the other is intended for individuals preparing 
to teach at the senior high school or junior college level or planning to continue with 
graduate studies leading to a doctorate in mathematics. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Mathematics, Secondary Education — M.S. 

GENERAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Professional education, subject-matter, credit, residence and other general require- 
ments for this degree are based upon those of the University. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree 
programs in Education, a student wishing to be accepted for the Master's degree 
program in Education with a concentration in Mathematics must have earned thirty (30) 
semester hours in mathematics including differential and integral calculus and dif- 
ferential equations. A student who fails to meet these qualifications will be expected to 
satisfy the requirements by enrolling in undergraduate courses before beginning his 
graduate studies in mathematics. 

A student may not receive credit for a course which is equivalent to one for which he 
has received an undergraduate grade of "C or above. 

JUNIOR HIGH — SENIOR HIGH CURRICULUM 

Non-thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, the student must complete the following: 

1. At least one mathematics course numbered higher than 626. 

2. Fifteen additional hours from the following: Mathematics 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 
607, 620, 623, 624, 651, 652, 700, 701, 710, 711, 715, 717, 720. 

3. An elective of 3 semester hours in education or mathematics or in an area related to 
mathematics. 

Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, a student must complete the following: 

1. At least one mathematics course numbered higher than 626. 

2. Fifteen additional semester hours in mathematics from the following: Mathe- 
matics 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 607, 620, 623, 624, 651, 652, 700, 701, 710, 711, 
715, 717, 720. 

3. A thesis focused on research in mathematics or in the teaching of mathematics. 

4. Three hours of electives. 

SENIOR HIGH — JUNIOR COLLEGE CURRICULUM 

Non-thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, a student must complete the following: 

1. Nine semester hours in mathematics courses numbered higher than 626. 



80 



2. Nine additional hours from the following: Mathematics 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 
607, 620, 623, 624, 651, 652, 700, 701, 710, 711, 715, 717, 720. 

3. An elective of three semester hours in education or mathematics or courses related 
to mathematics. 

Thesis Option: 30 s.h. required. 

In addition to the courses specified in the description of general requirements for a 
Master of Science in Education, a student must complete the following: 

1. Nine semester hours in mathematics courses numbered higher than 626. 

2. Nine additional hours from the following: Mathematics 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 
607, 620, 623, 624, 651, 652, 700, 701, 710, 711, 715, 717, 720. 

3. A thesis focused on a research in mathematics or in the teaching of mathematics. 

4. Three hours of electives. 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

MATHEMATICS 

Bolindra N. Borah, B.S., Cotton College, India; M.S., Ph.D., Oregon State Univer- 
sity; Professor 
J. Octavio Diaz, Doctorate in Mathematics and Physics, University of Havana; Associ- 
ate Professor 
Joseph B. Gruendler, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Associate Professor 
Herbert M. Heughan, B.S., M.S., Hampton Institute; Emeritus Associate Professor 
Wendell P. Jones, B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Iowa; Professor 
Wilbur L. Smith, B. S. , A. and T. College; M. A. , Ph. D. , the Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity; Professor 
Bichard B. Tucker, B.S., University of Washington; M.S., Ph.D., Oregon State Uni- 
versity; Professor 

COURSES 

225-600 Introduction to Modern Mathematics for Secondary School Teachers 

225-601 Algebraic Equations for Secondary School Teachers 

225-602 Modern Algebra for Secondary School Teachers 

225-603 Modern Analysis for Secondary School Teachers 

225-604 Modern Geometry for Secondary School Teachers 

225-606 Mathematics for Chemists 

225-607 Theory of Numbers 

225-608 Mathematics of Life Insurance 

225-620 Elements of Set Theory and Topology 

225-623 Advanced Probability and Statistics 

225-624 Methods of Applied Statistics 

225-625 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I 

225-626 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II 

225-631 Linear and Non-Linear Programming 

225-632 Games and Queueing Theory 

225-651 Methods in Applied Mathematics I 

225-652 Methods in Applied Mathematics II 

225-700 Theory of Functions of a Beal Variable I 

225-701 Theory of Functions of a Beal Variable II 

225-710 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I 

225-711 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable II 

225-715 Projective Geometry 

225-717 Special Topics in Algebra 

225-720 Special Topics in Analysis 

225-730 Thesis Besearch in Mathematics 



81 



MUSIC 

Jimmie Williams, Chairperson 
Office: Frazier Hall 

Courses Offered for Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

219-609. Music in Early Childhood 

219-610. Music in Elementary Schools Today 

219-611. Music in the Secondary Schools Today 

219-614. Choral Conducting of School Music Groups 

219-616. Instrumental Conducting of School Music Groups 

219-618. Psychology of Music 

219-620. Advanced Music Appreciation 

PHYSICS 

Jason Gilchrist, Chairperson 
Office: 109 Cherry Hall 

For Graduate Students Only 

227-705. General Physics for Science Teachers I 

(Formerly Physics 3885) 
227-706. General Physics for Science Teachers II 

(Formerly Physics 3886) 
227-707. Electricity for Science Teachers 

(Formerly Physics 3887) 
227-708. Modern Physics for Science Teachers I 

(Formerly Physics 3888) 
227-709. Modern Physics for Science Teachers II 

(Formerly Physics 3880) 

PLANT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Samuel J. Dunn, Chairperson 
Office: 238 Carver Hall 

Courses offered For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

100-601. Environmental Perception and Design Determinants 

100-602. Qualitative Analysis in Landscape Planning 

100-603. Land-Use Planning and Management 

100-604. Factors of Physical Design 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

130-600. Soil and Water Conservation Engineering I 

130-601. Advanced Farm Shop 

130-602. Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering 

130-700. Rural Electrification for Vocational Agricultural Teachers 

CROP SCIENCE 

130-603. Plant Chemicals 

130-604. Crop Ecology 

130-605. Breeding of Crop Plants 



82 



130-606. Special Problems in Crops 
130-607. Research Design and Analysis 
130-702. Grass Land Ecology 

EARTH SCIENCE 

130-616. Environmental Planning and Natural Resources Management 

130-622. Environmental Sanitation and Waste Management 

130-624. Earth Science, Geomorphology 

130-625. Earth Resources 

130-626. Aquaculture 

130-627. Strategies of Conservation 

130-703. Topics in Earth Science 

130-704. Problem Solving in Earth Science 

130-705. The Physical Universe 

130-706. Physical Geology 

130-708. Conservation of Natural Resources 

130-709. Seminar in Earth Science 

HORTICULTURE 

130-608. Special Problems in Horticulture 

130-610. Commercial Greenhouse Production I 

130-611. Commerical Greenhouse Production II 

130-612. Plant Materials and Landscape Maintenance 

130-613. Plant Materials and Planning Design 

PLANT SCIENCE 

130-618. General Forestry 
130-609. Special Problems in Soils 

For Graduate Students Only 

130-710. Soils of North Carolina 

SOIL SCIENCE 

130-609. Special Problems in Soils 

For Graduate Students Only 

130-710. Soils of North Carolina 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Amarjit Singh, Acting Chairperson 
Office: 223 Gibbs Social Sciences Building 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Courses offered For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

237-640. Federal Government 

237-641. State Government 

237-642. Modern Political Theory 

237-643. Urban Politics and Government 

237-644. International Law 

237-645. American Foreign Policy — 1945 to Present 



83 



237-646. The Politics of Developing Nations 
237-647. Research and Current Problems 
237-653. Urban Problems 

For Graduate Students Only 

237-730. Constitutional Development Since 1865 

237-741. Comparative Government 

237-742. Research and Current Problems 

237-743. Readings in Political Science 

SAFETY AND DRIVER EDUCATION 

I. Barnett, Chairperson 
Office: Price 112 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Safety and Driver Education — M.S. Degree 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the graduate degree programs in the Department of 
Safety and Driver Education is based upon the general admission requirements of the 
University. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

The graduate majors in Safety and Driver Education must complete 30 semester 
hours of course work at the graduate level. 

1. (The major course selection is competency based.) 

a. Six semester hours from the following areas in Education 

(1) The Nature of the Learner and the Learning Process 

(2) Current Critical Issues in American Education 

(3) Historical, Philosophical, and Sociological Foundations of Education 

(4) Curriculum, Supervision, etc. 

b. Eighteen hours in Safety and Driver Education 
(SDE 653, 756, and 757 are required courses) 

c. Three hours of electives 

d. Thesis (optional) 

2. Other Requirements 

a. A minimum of 3.0 grade point average for all graduate courses 

b. Final comprehensive examination in Education and Safety and Driver Educa- 
tion 

c. Qualifying Examination 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

A degree in this field prepares students for careers in such fields as Teaching, Re- 
search, State Agencies, Federal Agencies Fleet Supervisors, and lost control specialist 
in the Insurance Industries. 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY AND COURSES 

Isaac Barnett, B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., Michigan 
State University; Professor 

Nancy G. Hinckley, B.S., Trenton State College; M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State Univer- 
sity; Assistant Professor 



84 



JackN. Green, Sr., B.S., Southeastern State College; M.A., George Peabody College; 

M.S., Oklahoma State University; Assistant Professor 
*Horlin Carter, B.S., M.S., Marshall University; Assistant Professor 

COURSES 

360-651 Driver Education and Teaching Training 

360-652 Advanced Driver Education and Teacher Training 

360-653 Driver Education and General Safety 

360-654 Highway Transportation Systems 

360-655 Automotive Technology for Safety and Driver Education 

360-656 Highway Traffic Administration 

360-657 Traffic Engineering in Safety and Driver Education 

360-658 Curriculum Integration of Safety Education 

360-659 Motorcycle Safety Education 

360-750 Innovations in Safety and Driver Education 

360-751 Psychological Factors in Safety and Driver Education 

360-752 Alcohol and Safety and Driver Education 

360-755 School and Occupational Safety 

360-756 Seminar in Safety and Driver Education 

360-757 Administration and Supervision of Safety and Driver Education 

360-758 Independent Project in Safety and Driver Education 

360-759 Thesis Research in Safety and Driver Education 



SECONDARY EDUCATION AND CURRICULUM 

Dorothy Prince Barnett, Chairperson 
Office: 201 Hodgin Hall 

The Department of Secondary Education and Curriculum provides the professional 
studies component for the preparation of teachers and other school personnel at the 
bachelor's degree and master's degree levels. The department cooperates with the 
various academic departments of the University for teacher education preparation. 

At the master's degree level, approximately 20 to 40 percent of the graduate program 
is required for professional studies. Candidates for degrees in elementary education 
(Early Childhood Education, Intermediate) must complete a minimum of 12 semester 
hours and candidates in secondary education must complete a minimum of six semester 
hours in professional studies. Professional studies courses are selected from the follow- 
ing areas; 

1. Research 

2. The nature of the learner and the learning process 

3. Current critical issues in American education 

4. Historical, philosophical and sociological foundations of education 

5. Curriculum 

DIRECTOR OF FACULTY AND COURSES 
SECONDARY EDUCATION AND CURRICULUM 

Dorothy Prince Barnett, A.B., Oberlin College; M.A., Syracuse University; Ed.D., 

Indiana University; Professor 
Alfonso E. Gore, B.S., Bluefield State College; A.M., West Virginia University; 

C.A.G.S., Ed.D., Boston University; Professor 
Charles Hayes, A.B., Leland College; Ed.M., Loyola University (Illinois); Ed.D., 

University of Northern Colorado; Professor 

*On Leave 

85 



Frissell Jones, B.S., Hampton Institute, M.Ed., D.Ed., Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity; Professor 

Sarah S. Nelson, B.S., Allen University; M.S., Hunter College; Ph.D., Florida State 
University; Assistant Professor 

Albert Spruill, B.S., A.&T. College; M.S., Iowa State University; Ed.D., Cornell 
University; Professor and Dean of Graduate School 

COURSES 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

311-602. Extramural Studies II Credit 1-3 

311-605. Concepts of Career Education Credit 3(3-0) 

311-606. Curricular Integration of Career Education Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

311-607. Administration of Career Education Programs Credit 3(3-0) 

311-608. Seminar in Career Education Credit 3(3-0) 

311-625. Theory of American Public Education Credit 3(3-0) 

311-626. History of American Education Credit 3(3-0) 

311-627. The Afro-American Experience in American Education Credit 3(3-0) 

311-628. Seminar and Practicum in Urban Education Credit 3(1-4) 

311-641. Teaching the Culturally Disadvantaged Learner Credit 3(3-0) 

Graduate Students Only 

311-700. Introduction to Graduate Study Credit 2(2-0) 

311-701. Philosophy of Education Credit 3(3-0) 

311-702. Reading in Modern Philosophy of Education Credit 3(3-0) 

311-703. Educational Sociology Credit 3(3-0) 

311-710. Methods and Techniques of Research Credit 3(3-0) 

311-711. Educational Statistics Credit 3(3-0) 

311-720. Curriculum Development Credit 3(3-0) 

311-722. Curriculum in the Secondary School Credit 3(3-0) 

311-723. Principles of Teaching Credit 3(3-0) 

311-724. Problems and Trends in Teaching Science Credit 3(3-0) 

311-725. Problems and Trends in Teaching Social Sciences Credit 3(3-0) 
311-727. Workshop in Methods of Teaching Modern Mathematics 

for Junior and Senior High School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

311-780. Comparative Education Credit 3(3-0) 

311-782. Issues in Secondary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

311-784. Current Research in Secondary Education Credit 3(3-0) 

311-S785. Independent Readings in Education I Credit 1(0-2) 

311-S786. Independent Readings in Education II Credit 2(2-4) 

311-S787. Independent Readings in Education III Credit 3(0-6) 

311-S790. Seminar in Educational Problems Credit 3(1-4) 

311-S791. Thesis Research Credit 3 



SPEECH AND DRAMA 

Mary Moore, Chairperson 
Office: 304 Crosby Hall 

Courses Offered for Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Students 

215-610. Phonetics 

215-620. Community and Creative Dramatics 



86 



215-633. Speech for Teachers 

215-636. Persuasive Communication 

215-637. Television Production 

215-636. Television in Education 

215-650. Theatre Workshop 

SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL SERVICE 

Frances Logan, Chairperson 
Office: 251 Carver Hall 

Courses offered For advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

SOCIOLOGY 

235-600. Seminar in Social Planning 

235-601. Seminar in Urban Studies 

235-625. Sociology/Social Service Internship 

235-650. Independent Study in Anthropology 

235-651. Anthropological Experience 

235-669. Small Groups 

235-670. Law and Society 

235-671. Research Methods II 

235-672. Selected Issues in Sociology 

235-673. Population Studies 

235-674. Evaluation of Social Programs 

235-701. Seminar in Cultural Factors in Communication 



87